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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a project that is in photoshop EPS and I hear it's not a vector based program.

So will it not look as good when I send it to print?

Also, only parts are vectorized on some of the designs. About half of my designs are half vectored and the other half use all vector layers. All the non vectored stuff originally came from vector so I'm kind of mad at myself
for rasterizing it and saving. Will there be any problems? They look clean and all projects are at 300dpi.

I hear Illustrator rules vector land but I'm a pro at PS. What sets it apart?
Does it grab paths better when you auto? I'm hearing about livetrace and this and that and just wanna know.

One last question, I have this one design that I intend on using 1 color print with. The background is say white (tee color) and the design black.I want the design to be just outlines(when printed), but it's a solid vector shape. So what I did was drew another solid vector shape in white over the black design to make the black design look like it was an outline. So say I send this in Photoshop Eps, will they have trouble seperating this and keeping it to 1 color ? Because just by looking at it I'd figure yeah but just not sure.


Anything would greatly appreciated, and I'm already getting CS2 for my next set of designs. AAARRRHHHH!!!! Another classroom in a book!
 

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Hi, Henry. Welcome to the forum!

I will try to answer some of your questions. To start with, PS is a raster based program, and Illustrator is a vector based program. PS works with pixels, Illustrator works with vector points. If you are creating a path in PS, it's still going to be raster. That's just the nature of the program.

If you are saving at 300dpi in PS, you should have no problem with quality. The difference you have with a vector file is that it will have the same quality at 1" in size as it does at 100" in size.

For your one-color PS project, what I would do is flatten the image and save it as a high-res greyscale or bitmap tif. This will keep it a one color image and they should have no problem producing film for it.

Good luck with your next set of designs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
AddVenture said:
Hi, Henry. Welcome to the forum!

I will try to answer some of your questions. To start with, PS is a raster based program, and Illustrator is a vector based program. PS works with pixels, Illustrator works with vector points. If you are creating a path in PS, it's still going to be raster. That's just the nature of the program.

If you are saving at 300dpi in PS, you should have no problem with quality. The difference you have with a vector file is that it will have the same quality at 1" in size as it does at 100" in size.

For your one-color PS project, what I would do is flatten the image and save it as a high-res greyscale or bitmap tif. This will keep it a one color image and they should have no problem producing film for it.

Good luck with your next set of designs!

So are you saying that there's no noticble difference in a 300dpi TIFF project and a Illy vector?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AddVenture said:
if your tif file was created at the actual size you want it at 300dpi, then i would say you would be safe.
Well, initially it wasn't and I saw the difference, so I redid it.
I forgot I had it at 96 for web. So redone at 300 it looks clean.
So vector's a sham in ps. Dang it, I love that program. I imagine
Illy won't be that hard since I know ps and they're both Adobe.

I think I'm still gonna have a friend do separation though since
I imagine some edges will be lost if I send it flat. The battles
not over yet but expected one for the first run. Next time I'll
be better prepared for this, and I'll know Illy and separation...I
hope!hehehe

Thanks, and this site is awesome for guys like me looking for
advise.
 

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it really sounds like you want to use a vector program. if you know PS fairly well, Illust shouldn't be much of a leap. A lot of forum users use Corel Draw, also. I use Illustrator, mostly, but there is a lot of good information on the forum about Corel. Do a little comparison shopping to see what you like best before you buy. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, will do. The reason I'm thinking of Illy over Coral is that Illy is adobe and that's what I'm used to with PS, and also I'm guessing it'll integrate better w/ PS. Sounds like the live trace is only in Illy and it sounds awesome.

Even though PS isn't vector based I'm glad to have learned the concept
and the pen tool thru it. I think their version is for just scalability and cleaner lines within, but still raster. So if I can import my paths directly into
Illy it can be a snap. I imagine the pen tool is exactly the same in Illy too.

Lots to learn in this game.
 

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if you design at 300 dpi, you should have no problem with cleanliness. ive been designing/sepping for ~2 years at a shop. to be safe, i usually start at 15.5 x 18 inches at 300 dpi. then scale down later... (we go down to 200dpi, BTW for index seps.)

you would notice very little difference. if you are a perfectionist, and the image is mainly text or vectorish art, you could always design at 600 dpi, which will print film very close to the super cleanliness of illustrator vector. provided your artwork is done properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
jimiyo said:
if you design at 300 dpi, you should have no problem with cleanliness. ive been designing/sepping for ~2 years at a shop. to be safe, i usually start at 15.5 x 18 inches at 300 dpi. then scale down later... (we go down to 200dpi, BTW for index seps.)

you would notice very little difference. if you are a perfectionist, and the image is mainly text or vectorish art, you could always design at 600 dpi, which will print film very close to the super cleanliness of illustrator vector. provided your artwork is done properly.
Sweeeeeet, thanks.

I wish I would have been at 600 now. I think next time I'll do the separations. It doesn't sound hard.

I got some really good info today about "trapping" and other techniques.
Do all print shops who do inhouse separation use trapping? I like a thin feel and that achieves it. Just wondering for this first run on whether or not to leave it to them or do it myself.
 
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