T-Shirt Forums banner

81 - 89 of 89 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,202 Posts
But why is the rolling bad ? the new Epson pretreatment is as thin as water? can you add to much ? if you spray it on will you not roll in the end anyway or ?
If you do not have a well ventilated area for spraying, rolling would be better so as to not create airborne particulates. The problem with rolling is it's time consuming. Spraying is much quicker and I believe helps aid you in using less pretreat, but you are limited on the physical location you can set up to spray.

Automated machines help aid in these issues and can give you the best of both applications, but if it's not in someone's budget, then it's understandable. I've tested rolling preteat on garments back in 2005 and it just was more of a time waster than anything, so I set up the appropriate spray booth with excellent ventilation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
189 Posts
But why is the rolling bad ? the new Epson pretreatment is as thin as water? can you add to much ? if you spray it on will you not roll in the end anyway or ?
Yes the pretreat is thin but even when you put thin paint on a roller and then try to paint a wall, you can see how blotchy it is until you put more pressure and several more coats on. Do a dozen shirts and no 2 will be the same. I was bound and determined also to use a roller as suggested by epson. Fortunately I got the chance to see auto units at the ISS show and the EZ Speedtreator convinced me to not treat this as a hobby but a business. IMHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Yes, thanks again harry for getting a technician to help me with the Speedtreater earlier. The thing is amazingly simple to use.

I did some prints on a few tank tops (next level 100% ringspun cotton) and there were fibers sticking up (at setting speed #50). I am still testing out different settings on the machine itself, but I set the Speedtreater to #30-#35 and the outcome was much better (i brushed it down after pretreat as well just to be sure).

will post up some pictures later when i get a chance. Thanks

If you've got fibers sticking up, try adjusting the pressure on your heat press. Medium to medium-high pressure works best. Also, make sure your cover paper comes off the shirt cleanly and doesn't peel off.

-Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
Even with the viper one I started brushing the fibers down with a paint brush and made a world of a difference. also I agree the paper comes off clean after pressing helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Sorry I don't understand the last two posts, what do you mean with the paper comes off clean ? do you mean you press after the pretreatment and the paper should be dry or ? I am a little confused, but I want to take all the advice I can get :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
Sorry I don't understand the last two posts, what do you mean with the paper comes off clean ? do you mean you press after the pretreatment and the paper should be dry or ? I am a little confused, but I want to take all the advice I can get :)
What they mean is that the paper should come right off without it sticking to the shirt. If you feel like your peeling the paper off the shirt, like you would a sticker, then the fibers would stick right back up and not stay flat causing fibrillation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,768 Posts
Thats the point. If everything is dry then it does not stick. But with kraft paper or other silicon papers if not dry then they stick when pulling off the shirt.
 
81 - 89 of 89 Posts
Top