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How about a 28" version. boldhardware.com The model number is KV8450B-28.

I thought about getting the same one at Lowes, but the 1400 likes to advance about 4 inches on boot-up and about 5 inches on ejection. So I wanted some extra room to work with.
 

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It's all good information.

Here's something I found interesting about the CD Switch. When you get the general error lights and you power off and power on the unit and it doesn't clear. I flip the sensor to the open position and power off and back on the printer. It'll move the ink system slowly to the left and back to the right, then the its ready to go.

I was experiencing this when I the paper jam sensor missed its mark. I was tired of holding on the original cd switch while the ink system moved from one end to the other so I replaced it with a small toggle switch. Now when I get the error light and it doesn't clear with the normal on/off printer button. I flip the switch to the open position and power the unit up. Once it's ready, I flip the switch back to the closed position. Works most of the time for me.
;)
 

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Ok, based on the modifications from the original diydtg plans, I was going to cut my drawer at 20" deep in order to account for an extra inch beyond what the 1400 can print at a maximum.
Does this sound ok? And then now that I have the drawer glides and I understand how they work, I'm assuming I have to place the print mechs near the front rather than in the exact center and make the lower base 28" deep and mount the drawer glides near the back.
the print head should be located at about 20" from the back then (and the PE switch as well)

Any comments or suggestions before I move forward with those measurements?
 

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Ok, based on the modifications from the original diydtg plans, I was going to cut my drawer at 20" deep in order to account for an extra inch beyond what the 1400 can print at a maximum.
Does this sound ok? And then now that I have the drawer glides and I understand how they work, I'm assuming I have to place the print mechs near the front rather than in the exact center and make the lower base 28" deep and mount the drawer glides near the back.
the print head should be located at about 20" from the back then (and the PE switch as well)

Any comments or suggestions before I move forward with those measurements?
Some things to take into considerations:
If the printer frame will be in a fixed position..
Position of the main roller (this will spin the max length 19 inches) Plus an additional five inches or so on ejection (unless you let the drawer portion slide off the main roller)
When powering up the printer, it will move the drawer about four inches. (Simply just push it back in place and no adjustment).
One end of the drawer slide position should be position near the main roller.
 

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I've built my lower tray, my drawer, applied the gripping tape, mounted the glides, have not gotten as far as mounting the drawer inside the base, but the roller is installed and it appeared that it would work well, but I have to do some sanding on the edges of the drawer since it scraped a tiny bit of the grit off the paper-feed roller on the one side due to a wavy cut I made with the jigsaw. the hard part is almost over though.

My drawer is 24 inches, so even if it feeds a few inches on bootup, it'll still be in almost correct printing position.
What I need to know is, is the PE switch the one that tells the printer that it is in position and ready to print? or does the PE switch indicate that the "paper" needs to be moved forward a tiny bit more before actually printing.

Has anyone mounted the PE switch to be triggered by the drawer, or by the platen? If anyone has some more pictures of how they're using that switch I'd appreciate it.
 

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I've built my lower tray, my drawer, applied the gripping tape, mounted the glides, have not gotten as far as mounting the drawer inside the base, but the roller is installed and it appeared that it would work well, but I have to do some sanding on the edges of the drawer since it scraped a tiny bit of the grit off the paper-feed roller on the one side due to a wavy cut I made with the jigsaw. the hard part is almost over though.

My drawer is 24 inches, so even if it feeds a few inches on bootup, it'll still be in almost correct printing position.
What I need to know is, is the PE switch the one that tells the printer that it is in position and ready to print? or does the PE switch indicate that the "paper" needs to be moved forward a tiny bit more before actually printing.

Has anyone mounted the PE switch to be triggered by the drawer, or by the platen? If anyone has some more pictures of how they're using that switch I'd appreciate it.
That's pretty quick work...

Yes, the switch tells the printer that it needs to be moved a bit before printing.

What ever device you use to trigger the switch, with the 1400, you will need to have somewhere between an 1 inch to 1 1/4 inch gap before the sensor gets triggered.

My switch is only mounted temporarily. I chose the drawer since the platen will have a tshirt there and it'll probably get in the way.

Also, however you mount the sensor, when the drawer gets put pack into positon that it doesn't break the sensor.
 

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I wish i had access to a table saw, then I would have had this done even quicker and more professional (i.e. straight lines) although in this setup, all the straight areas of the cuts don't seem to matter except for the ones touching the roller.
I'll be posting some pictures on monday once I get the drawer mounted. The next step after that is cutting holes with a hole saw for the two motors that I need to mount in the wood in order to trigger the ASF sensor and move the paper feed roller.
 

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I know what you mean by straight. I considered buying a table saw, but opted for my handy dandy skill saw instead. I've got that uneven cut too...

The second motor that you are talking about. Is that the one comes from the black housing that houses the paper? I didn't have a solution for that so I wound up mounting the housing on top of the power supply. How did you work out the rotation of the motor to the sensor on that small 1.5 inch circuit board?
 

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Hello folks. I am new to the forum. I found you surfing for homemade mods to convert a 1400 to dtg. I have read just about every thread you have on here regarding the subject and have seen a lot of references to "plans". I know they are for a different Epson printer but figure that basic theories are the same. Can you tell me where I can those?
 

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Nevermind. The one piece I skip and it happens to be the section that mentioned it. Go figure! I am very interested in hearing how things go with your builds. I will chronicle my own and post along the way.
 

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I've hit Roadblock # 1....

I have the frame, drawer and slides together, it rotates decently by hand, but much to my dismay, I find that there's no way in any form that the built in motor has enough torque or power to turn the rod when the drawer is on top. So I'd have to find a solution before I can continue, I can't figure out how the DIYDTG guy managed to get his drawer to move with the puny torque this motor has. That is a 12V motor, correct? or is it more? 12V can move the bar with no load on it, but even with it loosely laying on top it won't budge.

Also a second issue, the no-slip tape seems to be grinding a bit of the grit off the paper feed bar, which I'm sure will not be good in the long run. The only way I've found to prevent slipping of the feed and causing possible print skips is to put pressure/weight on the drawer and of course this increases the load of the paper feed motor.

Minty:
As for the rotary sensor and the 1.5" board, I'm currently looking for extensions for the flex cable since I already dismantled the paper feed unit, I won't be able to get it back together (I figured it was necessary to take it off because of platen height considerations) but it seems to make it past boot up just holding the motor in line with the sensor so the wheel rotates. I noticed there are reducing gears on the motor side of the ASF which obviously affect the rotation of the wheel's movement through the sensor, but holding the motor in line with the sensor with that wheel attached seemed to work nonetheless, I don't know if it'll work so well when I do an actual paper feed and not just a bootup test. That's a problem for later though. Gotta fix this paper feed motor issue first.
 

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I've hit Roadblock # 1....

I have the frame, drawer and slides together, it rotates decently by hand, but much to my dismay, I find that there's no way in any form that the built in motor has enough torque or power to turn the rod when the drawer is on top. So I'd have to find a solution before I can continue, I can't figure out how the DIYDTG guy managed to get his drawer to move with the puny torque this motor has. That is a 12V motor, correct? or is it more? 12V can move the bar with no load on it, but even with it loosely laying on top it won't budge.

Also a second issue, the no-slip tape seems to be grinding a bit of the grit off the paper feed bar, which I'm sure will not be good in the long run. The only way I've found to prevent slipping of the feed and causing possible print skips is to put pressure/weight on the drawer and of course this increases the load of the paper feed motor.

Minty:
As for the rotary sensor and the 1.5" board, I'm currently looking for extensions for the flex cable since I already dismantled the paper feed unit, I won't be able to get it back together (I figured it was necessary to take it off because of platen height considerations) but it seems to make it past boot up just holding the motor in line with the sensor so the wheel rotates. I noticed there are reducing gears on the motor side of the ASF which obviously affect the rotation of the wheel's movement through the sensor, but holding the motor in line with the sensor with that wheel attached seemed to work nonetheless, I don't know if it'll work so well when I do an actual paper feed and not just a bootup test. That's a problem for later though. Gotta fix this paper feed motor issue first.
You should be able to deal with the weight by putting part of that load on the drawer rail. I only used one rail. You may be able to adjust it by adjusting the height of rail that is mounted onto the drawer assembly.

I've built mine on the original parts (plus extended some of the wires) and plywood. I didn't use the non skid tape since the roller had some type of material on it. I figured when the roller material gets worn, I'll apply the non skid tape then.
 

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Well the only problem I have is that if I adjust the height at all, it slips or skips moving, etc. which will ruin a print. I am using a pair of glides and they're not hanging up at all, they're fully lubed and are smooth, but it still skips once in awhile when advancing by hand. currently I've decided not to attach the rails up front but only in the back so the drawer can be lifted and moved backwards into starting position. Either way though, the motor isn't strong enough (at least with the 12V that I tried) to move the drawer at all.
 

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you said "slides" above, do yu have just the one drawer slide or have you put one on each side ? its not moving because its binding somewhere, dont use two, you will never get it lined up correctly, one works fine, if your just useing one try adjusting it maybe you have to much pressure on the roller. You will need no skid tape in the long run, the stuff on the roller wears off f\irly quickly and if i were you i would do it now and sort out your binding issues with it fitted, otherwise you will get it all going then a few weeks down the line you will have to fit the no skid and your likely to get yet more binding problems.

** i see you al;ready responded before i did! anyway you will want to remove a slide, it wont work like that, when just one is fitted the weight of the tray makes the contact, you really dont need two anyway.
 

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Ryan, I agree with Steve. Use one slide for the drawer assembly. There will be some stress on the side with the slide assembly, but the weight will hit the roller.

I put my drawer/platen on a scale, it weighs in around 13 pounds.

One thing I did notice about my drawer slides when I got them. One had abit more resistance than the other.
 

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the weight of the tray can be a problem and cause the pf motor to prematurely burn out, i now have an aluminium tray that works well, bought from an ebay metal sheet seller, i just supplied the dimensions, he cut it to fit and even put the bend and drilled the holes to attach it to the drawer slide, cost £25, worth every penny.
 

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the weight of the tray can be a problem and cause the pf motor to prematurely burn out, i now have an aluminium tray that works well, bought from an ebay metal sheet seller, i just supplied the dimensions, he cut it to fit and even put the bend and drilled the holes to attach it to the drawer slide, cost £25, worth every penny.
That's a great idea.

I've considered the whole bottom section, but not the drawer/platen. A great improvement.
 
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