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Have an order coming down the pipes for some "Under Armour" clothing. Has anyone ever embroidered on this stuff?....I hate these technical fabrics and don't want to risk damaging the garments with trial and error methods. Anyone have any tips or advice on placement, settings, backings, etc. it would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I use a heat fusible mesh on these. You basically turn the garment inside out, cut a piece of fusible mesh larger than your hoop and then iron it where you are going to hoop. And then I use a no show diamond mesh. They are very thin but hold a lot of stitches and don't show through visibly or because of thickness from the front. I get both the fusible and diamond mesh from RNK Distributing
 

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The link I posted above is to the one that actually developed that stabilizer. RNK handles Floriani stabilizers. While Fred Lebow and RNK have parted ways, there are other distributors that Fred is working with now. Both are great products.
 

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Look here. http://www.lebowconsulting.com

He is the priemere expert on stabilizers. Send him the question and he can tell you what is recommended.
Ken -Thanks u - although quite late but here is the best advice on embroidering Performance Wear

and pls email me directly for samples
[media]http://www.lebowconsulting.com/performance-wear.pdf[/media]

Choosing The Right Stabilizer For Embroidery on Performance Wear​
By Fred Lebow​
As with any stretchy fabric, embroidering on performance wear can be tricky if you don’t use the right
stabilizer. It’s possible that the embroidery may look fine when you finish it, but without proper support
after washing it can pucker and even lose registration as stitches are pulled out of shape.
The best stabilizer to use for most performance styles is a no-show diagonal nylon mesh. It has a diagonal
embossed pattern that is more stable than previous versions. When this type of mesh is still in its
molten form, a giant steam roller comes over it to give it an embossed pattern. This enhances its stability
and the diagonal pattern offers the greatest degree of multidirectional stability. This means it is easier to
hoop drum tight, which allows for the tightest registration and least amount of puckering and looping.
A way to good test your stabilizer’s directional stability is to stretch it in all directions including diagonally.
The more multi-directionally stable the material is, the better the registration. No show diagonal mesh
does stretch a little, which is ideal for stretchy fabrics because it will give as the garment gives.
No-show mesh has other advantages for use on performance wear over other cutaways. It is softer,
which means it feel better against the skin and drapes better. Also, the mesh is lighter in weight and
more translucent so it’s invisible to the naked eye when viewed from the front of the shirt. This is especially
important if your performance wear is white or light colored. Traditional stabilizers can sometimes
be seen from the front of the shirt as a stiff white square detracting from the overall appearance of the
embroidery.
If your stitch counts range between 10,000 and 12,000 stitches, one layer of the diagonal no-show mesh
will be sufficient. If your design has more than 10,000 stitches or the stitches are very dense, or they are
satin stitches, you will want to pair a layer of no-show mesh with a layer of mid-weight tearaway. Put the
mesh closest to the shirt and the tearaway behind it. You will remove the excess tearaway, leaving the
soft, sheer, invisible mesh against the body. No show nylon mesh also will protect the skin against
scratchy stitches if you use a metallic thread that is a little rougher in texture.​
Fred Lebow is the non wovens product manager for Cotswold Industries, a manufacturer of embroidery
stabilizers. Visit the Web site at​
www.lebowconsulting.com for more stabilizer articles, information, and
to request free samples.

NoShowMesh​
One of the biggest advantages of No Show
Diagonal Mesh is that it is soft against the skin.
So it also can be used to protect the wearer
against scratchy feeling stitches when metallic
threads are used.​
Photo courtesy of Darrell Luke,

Threads of Compassion, Fla. Orlando, Fla.
 

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That answer is basically what we were saying. I also use a fusible to "hold" the material and use a now show diamond mesh.
Thanks

You are using the right product

Diamond mesh is the term we used for the diagonal mesh originally when it it the market
( I did not develop this ).
It is the bwest backing that I have dealt w in my 33 yrs of making them.

I (we) re- developed most of the items
and we made the fusible a low melt 260F so as not to scorch nor shrink yopur fabric.

More importantly, using a tearaway behind it increases the
"tambourine skin" type tension, that you want
to approach, in the hoop for proper registration or defimition.
It makles your image, esp lettering mopre crisp
The wt of the teatraway would be 1.5 to 2 oz depending on stitchcounts and densities

Fred
www.lebowconsulting.com
 

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Sorry for refreshing the thread, but may I first say it's been a very timely thread as we now have a UA jacket to embroider. Here we go......:rolleyes:
I'm just needing to clarify some questions. First, is the mesh REALLY needed and am I correct that it replaces the "regular" backing? Second, Craig, am I correct you iron on the fusible mesh, then hoop it along with the no-show on top (as in on the very bottom of the embroidery)? What's the advantage in using both? (why not just the fusible)

Last, is this what we're talking about here: Mesh Backing: Colman and Company - Discount Commercial Embroidery Supplies - Machine Embroidery Supplies Catalog It doesn't mention diamond pattern, does that really matter?

Thanks, any help appreciated for this here [somewhat] newbie!!:p
 

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Yes, you are correct, I iron the fusible on the back side where the design will go, and then I use a no show mesh just like you would use a standard stabilizer. You probably can go without the second no show mesh, but I like to use as much stabilizing as I can with a fabric that moves and stretches like that. And since the no show is so lightweight, it doesn't add bulkiness to the shirt.
 

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This is the product I use. RNK Distributing
I developed this for RNK (Floriani) When my wife & I resigned almost 2 years ago we redeveloped everything and gave it to all of our other distributors

However we did change the f:rolleyes:usible coating to a low melt
We have a distrib in GA would you like samples
and prices?

Fred
 

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On the Under Armour - there is no concern of 'melting' the shirts? I've never ironed a backing to a shirt - though I do use woven mesh backing for performance wear.
 
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