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It's not hard. Even just starting out.

I got a couple hundred people to sign up for my opt-in newsletter. The only people I told were family, friends, and those that went to my page from this forum (when I had my url in my signature).

Word spread and I have several hundred now, and have never sold 1 shirt online.
 

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KeenT said:
Yes but when you are starting from zero may be to buy or rent a list would help.
Some company garanti that their email list are optin.
How can the customer opt-in if they've never heard of you?

Opting in to a different newsletter is hardly informed consent to be spammed by whoever the list gets sold to, no matter what the fine print might have said when they handed over their e-mail address.
 

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I used Constant Contact when I was working for an athletic sock company last year. I would put together tradeshow reminders of what booth we were going to be at and what promos we would be running at the show.

I don't know the exact numbers on how it might have affected sales, kind of hard to track, but Constant Contact does give you numbers on what percentage of people opened your newsletter/campaign.

One thing we did through Constant Contact was a Survey through Survey Monkey and sent it our to our different lists. This was great! We received soo much useful feedback.

http://www.constantcontact.com/index.jsp

http://www.surveymonkey.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Solmu said:
Opting in to a different newsletter is hardly informed consent to be spammed by whoever the list gets sold to, no matter what the fine print might have said when they handed over their e-mail address.
I was just looking at http://www.infousa.com
They looks to know what they are doing, did anyone try them?

A friend of mine received an email campaign from CP to advertise their services to his business, so I guess it must be working
 

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Jasonda said:
Unless someone specifically requests to receive a newsletter from your company, it's spam. You can call it whatever you want, you can get their email address from any "reputable" company you want, but it is still spam. Spam sucks.

Just my two cents.
Personally I agree 100%
 

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I agree as well, I can't stand spam. I would only use Constant Contact as a way to communicate with people who have signed up for our newsletter or verbally agreed it was ok to recieve such e-mails from us. They can always opt out of Constant Contact if they change their minds.
 

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KeenT said:
Ok guys thanks. It looks like I'm going to save some money by giving up on this unless one of you would like to do some cross selling.
I don't see why you would want to give it up. Newsletters can be an excellent marketing tool, and it doesn't have to be expensive. You just need to make sure that the people you send it to are expecting to receive it.

The best way to do that is to put a newsletter sign-up on your website so your customers can sign up as they choose, as opposed to buying a list from somewhere. It is also helpful to have a "Privacy Policy" available for people to read, which says that you won't give or sell their information to anyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Oh I'm not giving up at all on newsletter, I know it's very important to build my database and it's why I don't like any of this fulfillment company who keep the contact of shop's owner customer for themself.
I was just enquiring about renting a list of millions of people in my niche market.
But for now may be just advertising is the way.
Hub
 

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I happen to specialize in crafting creative campaigns (also called viral campaigns) for non profits at GoodStorm, and we've run some very excellent merch-centered email campaigns to raise them money. Aside from the spam factor (though these non-profits were only emailing their membership lists), I've found that t-shirt campaigns worked when they were timely, topical, and interesting.

Would you consider trying to sell shirts to raise money for an organization? Perhaps a way to get people to your site is to donate a portion of the proceeds to a charity that you care about. It may sound gimmicky, but the charity won't mind you raising money on their behalf, neither will the beneficiaries of those charities.

Regardless of tying your shirts into a greater cause - everyone loves to laugh - if you can minimize what you're selling and create an interesting email, people won't mind getting it, and maybe even pass it on. (But please - no "you must send this email to 10 friends or your hair will fall out tomorrow emails!)
 

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newsletters definetly seem to have a good response. No one likes spam! Most people have spam blockers on their email anyways. Have a newsletter that tells people about sales, new merchandise.. even try offering a discount or random coupons for your merchandise as a prompt to sign up for the newsletters.. (like suscribers recieve free discounts, etc) People love stuff for cheap or on a sale, especially when it makes them feel important like that.
 

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Jasonda said:
Unless someone specifically requests to receive a newsletter from your company, it's spam. You can call it whatever you want, you can get their email address from any "reputable" company you want, but it is still spam. Spam sucks.

Just my two cents.

Exactly.

If you buy an email list, Solmu and I will come around your house and put our feet on your furniture.
 
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