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I've seen the post from a few years back printing on towels with a Brother machine and they look great:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/brother/t100204.html#post2164258

Wondered if anybody else who has done lots of towel printing could share advice on this. Two questions.

1. Does one particular brand of machine work better than another for printing towels?
2. How are you curing the towels? I'm afraid using a heat press will smash the terry fabric.
 

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I've seen the post from a few years back printing on towels with a Brother machine and they look great:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/brother/t100204.html#post2164258

Wondered if anybody else who has done lots of towel printing could share advice on this. Two questions.

1. Does one particular brand of machine work better than another for printing towels?
2. How are you curing the towels? I'm afraid using a heat press will smash the terry fabric.


A major advantage that direct to garment printing has for printing towels is that dtg printers use water based inks. This leaves a no hand feel for the print on the towels. Most textile screen printers use plastisol ink which leaves an almost sandpaper feel on a towel. Not the feeling most customers want to have.

A hot air conveyor dryer is the ideal way to heat set the ink on towels. Obviously no smashing then.

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I recommend to dtg printers to towels and other non-t-shirt products all the time. Just did a seminar on this at the Indy show. We heat press the towels all the time. The terry side comes back with a quick wash. You don't really need a lot of pressure either. So you can cure using a conveyor dryer or a heat press.

If you go with a conveyor dryer, make sure you get samples and the exact details (i.e. dwell time, temperature, what dryer model,...) was used so you know exactly what you need and how to reproduce it. Due to the differences in inks, some dtg printer models require a specific type or size of dryer - which may be more than you are willing to spend. Others will require 240 volt electricity - which you may have to pay an electrician to install. Whatever you are told, get it in writing. This will help ensure you can reproduce the results should you go that route.

Best wishes,

Mark
 

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I've seen the post from a few years back printing on towels with a Brother machine and they look great:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/brother/t100204.html#post2164258

Wondered if anybody else who has done lots of towel printing could share advice on this. Two questions.

1. Does one particular brand of machine work better than another for printing towels?
2. How are you curing the towels? I'm afraid using a heat press will smash the terry fabric.



Any direct to garment printer brand should be able to do towels.

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we do light colored golf towels with full color print all the time on our DTG with great results and very happy customers. Even with the cheaper $1 a piece fringed edge towels with some small nap we get great printing results. most customers could care less about a little nap on the towel affecting the end result. it only alters the image slightly if the nap lays the other direction. We pretreat and press as normal and done.

here are some of my own promo items i printed when i had an event. both the shirts and towels were printed on the dtg machine. The cd's on a dif machine.
 

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we do light colored golf towels with full color print all the time on our DTG with great results and very happy customers. Even with the cheaper $1 a piece fringed edge towels with some small nap we get great printing results. most customers could care less about a little nap on the towel affecting the end result. it only alters the image slightly if the nap lays the other direction. We pretreat and press as normal and done.

here are some of my own promo items i printed when i had an event. both the shirts and towels were printed on the dtg machine. The cd's on a dif machine.


Very nice. And there should be no hand (ink feel) on the print on the towels. That is one major advantage direct to garment printers have over textile screen printers. For the most part screen printers would use plastisol ink which gives almost a sandpaper feel to the print. Not the type of feel you want on a towel.
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The least expensive method is to use clear acrylic spray paint. Available at Home Depot and Lowes.

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Yes. Definitely get your post treatment from home places. You'll only spend a few bucks. Colman and company is over priced. Their post treatment is $28 and is basically the same stuff as the $2 one.
 
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