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The variability in apearance is one of the reasons I don't like white ink DTG.
Yup. Most of the samples I've gotten from Amazon Merch looked pretty weak when it came to white, but they up and knocked my socks off one day with a really nicely done print with good "pop." It's stood up to the wash well, so wasn't a case of overdoing the pretreatment.

CustomCat / MyLocker is rolling out a process they call DigiSoft. It is supposed to be more consistent than DTG. I'm not sure exactly what it is as of yet, but white comes out well. Still haven't begun to wash test the samples.
 

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DIGISOFT™ is just a marketing term they decided to use for DTF.
Using a trademarked term makes it look "special".

Obviously they are now using DTF for printing on:
a) thick hoodies, and
b) polyester garments.

The reasons for DTF:
a) hoodies and polyester tees are difficult to print in DTG, and misprints can easily cost $5 to $15.
b) DTF is actually looks and feels pretty good on hoodies.
c) DTF is a good alternative to vinyl for polyester athletic garments.

My guess is they are keeping cotton tees on DTG for a few reasons.
Here are some of them:
a) In many cases DTG looks and feels a lot better than DTF on t-shirts... especially on white t-shirts.
b) They will need to figure out how to allocate design types to each method, without totally messing up consistency. Printing one shirt in DTG and the next in DTF will cause confusion, complaints, and returns.
c) Their existing customer base have DTG samples for their designs.
They say they are going all DigiSoft, just that poly and hoodies are first. They also imply that it is not DTF, as they claim DigiSoft has the best features of both DTG and DTF without the downsides of either.

The prints are not shiny, or overly thick. The print conforms to the texture of the fabric.

We've been around this block before :p
 
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