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OK, Seriously... I know absolutely nothing about t-shirts. I've never been around them for the making. This all came sudden with a spontaneous thought just now.

What are the do's & dont's in preparation of vector files for screen printing or whatever ya call it. Mind me for saying whatever, i'll learn the proper terminologies as I go along. What are some of the guidelines/rules that you may follow and are willing to share your experiences with me and others. I have some
pretty ripe designs that i'd like to see if they meet within standards to say or will
I have to go back and refurbish them. I deal mainly with vectors, so mentioning photoshop and the like isnt much of a concern. Some drawings can be a tad nodic. I need to know my boundaries of what lines not to cross in my designs (no pun intended).

Im a 100% Coreldraw X3 user and dabble at times in Illustrator for certain tasks.

Can you shed some new light for me? I'd like to hear the views of others if you dont mind.


Thanx ppl!

-Ronnie
 

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hi ronnie,

i use illustrator for my vector art, but the guidelines are pretty much the same. vector art lends itself well to spot colors. using spot colors can make separations a breeze with illustrator or corel, so i choose colors from the pms palet. i stay away from halftones when possible, and i use a lighter pms color instead of a halftone of a darker color. this makes for a much nicer looking image as halftones can sometimes look spotty with 65 lpi dot. if you do find that you need to use halftones, make sure to change the percentage of the actual color and don't make it a transparancy.

the only other advice i can offer you is to be sure change all your fonts to outlines before sending the file to your printer.

i hope this helps you, good luck!
 

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No matter what you do in Corel, Illy or photoshop as long at the person separating the art knows what they are doing and the printer as well you can do what ever you want. A seasoned separator and printer can pretty much work with anything you give. Only thing I would reccomend is paying attention to your number of colors. Many designs with tons of colors can be reduced to a manageable amount being printed yet there are some limitations. Your printers total number of colors ability to print is the main one.

Smaller areas in a design can be mixed on press yet I would advise staying away from large areas. Halftones are not a problem as long as the output device an accurately print them and the printer can reproduce them on both screen and press.
 

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yes you can but it is still limited.
regular CMYK separations.
PMS color separations. - for this the art needs to be created using PMS color. Anything else will sep cmyk. If you use 50 PMS color it will separate 50 PMS plates. Knowledge in separations is a must even with the advanced print options inside the Corel Print engine.
 

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Be careful about sending art any old way to a silk screener alot of times they will charge you extra if your art is wrong and that can happen even if it's vector. When I set up art for silk screening I use PMS spot colors and set all the traps. Maybe it's the artist in me but I don't like someone else messing around with my art, it makes me nervous so I make sure I give it to the screener pretty much exactly as heneeds it. If you are unsure you can always contact the printer, trust me they will be greatful for getting correct art.
 
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