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Discussion Starter #1
In February I made the final decision to do sublimation and bought all of the equipment, supplies, and software to start a business up with. Nothing, and I mean nothing came with simple "this is how you do it" instructions. After turning on CorelDraw X3 for the first time, I closed it and sat down and cried. What have I done? :(

Last month I stumbled on some instruction DVDs for beginners in CorelDraw. The first from Steven Spence, which gave some really good simplistic instructions for someone like me who has NEVER done anything with any designing software. That one eased my fears a little bit and I played with the software doing some simple things.

The second was from Lynda.com. Wow. Ok, so I'm now on chapter 6 (out of 20) and I'm on an information overload. :rolleyes: Thursday I learned that I could take things from other software programs and put them into CorelDraw, and I learned that the software I have for my photos (Adobe Photoshop Elements) has the ability to pull objects out of photos.

Armed with my new knowledge I spent all day Friday playing around with the software and ended up making the 2 tags for my granddaughter that I'm including little pics of. :p But, it took 10 hours to make these 2 tags! TEN hours! :( There is no way I'm ever going to be able to make a living at this if it takes that long with every project.

How long does it really take before I'm going to really understand how this software works? And when I'm done with the beginner stuff, where do I find more advanced instructions? I don't want to be stuck with just basic knowledge of this stuff. But none of the schools around here offer any courses in CorelDraw. And I can't find any intermediate and advanced instructional DVDs on it either. Do any of you know of any?

What is weeding, by the way. They keep mentioning that term and I have no idea what it means, but I'm thinking it is something important that I should know about.
 

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Yes it will get easier...I just did 20 name tags for a client...sublimation w/ mag backs...took total of 15 minutes....so it does get easier...
Dont try to absorb everything in one long learning/watching...take your time...get familiar with one thing...then do the next

Weeding the process of removing unwanted parts of a transfer manually...typically it is for vinyl cutting, when one removes the unwanted part of the vinyl...also there are some papers for inkjets that are self weeding ...meaning that you do not have to trim after printing...the image can be weeded automatically
 

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Loretta, Advanced Artist has more Corel tutorials, I think they might have what you are looking for. They are also members here in the forum.

Don't give up. Just keep practicing, pretty soon it will be second nature. But it will take some time. Once you are up to speed it shouldn't take you more than 10-15 minutes to make designs like those tags.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you Charles for your answer and encouragement. I can't imagine doing all of that in just 20 minutes. After I was able to separate Baron from the picture he was in, I couldn't remember how to do it again. But come to think of if, I was just as bad when I was learning MS Word. Time. Lots and lots of time. I didn't know paper could self weed (I learned a new term today). What kind is that? I don't do vinyl yet, not even sure what it is exactly, but I know I'm not doing it yet.

But again, thanks.
 

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Thank you, Jasonda. I will look up Advanced Artist and see what they offer.

I almost started a fire in the house back in May when I was learning how to use my mug press! It took almost 4 months to get my first order done and out the door. Thank heavens the woman was willing to wait while I learned how to make a mug. I haven't gotten paid for it yet, but I can only assume she'll make me wait just as long for a payment. But that's OK. It was a learning process and mugs no longer frighten me.

I've also conquered the mug press thanks to the helpful suggestions of the folks here on this forum. What a blessing this website is for beginners like myself.
 

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I almost started a fire in the house back in May when I was learning how to use my mug press! It took almost 4 months to get my first order done and out the door. Thank heavens the woman was willing to wait while I learned how to make a mug. I haven't gotten paid for it yet, but I can only assume she'll make me wait just as long for a payment. But that's OK. It was a learning process and mugs no longer frighten me.
Now that you can make a mug in less than 4 months, you need to get at least 50% deposit before you start an order, because people will still take 4 months to pay even if they get the mug the next day.
 

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Would it be asking too much to ask for a 100% payment at the time of the order? When I go to McDonalds I have to pay for the whole order before I get my food, so why would this be that much different? There is a lot of work involved in making this stuff.
 

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Would it be asking too much to ask for a 100% payment at the time of the order? When I go to McDonalds I have to pay for the whole order before I get my food, so why would this be that much different? There is a lot of work involved in making this stuff.
Nope, it's fine to ask for 100%. But realize that you may lose potential customers that way, especially if you don't have a lot of examples of past work to show them, and especially if your competitors are only asking for 50%.

As long as you get the 50% deposit and signed approval of the design/layout/materials/qty before you start making the product, you should be ok. If you have the situation where they pay 50% and are not happy with the end product and don't want to pay the rest, you don't have to give them the product. The best thing in this situation is to negotiate a discount (say 10% or 20%) or give them a discount on a future order.
 

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Hi, Loretta - First, Congrats for sticking with it - you're probably closer to getting it than you think!

In X3 - click the Help menu on the toolbar at the top of the page. A Drop-down box opens - Click "Help Topics" at the top of the box. A new page will open - Spend some time clicking around on that page until you get a feel on how it works (don't worry, you can't hurt anything) - there's lots of good info there.

Also, on the same Help Menu on the top toolbar - click "Hints" - you'll see more info on how everything works open-up in the docker on the right side of the page. Good Stuff.

And lastly, you're in luck - there are tons of free X3 tutorials on the Internet. Just Google: CorelDraw tutorials and you'll find a bunch - here's one link to get started - Good Luck!

CorelDraw 101: Basic Toolbox
 

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The first steps are always the hardest to do, just watch
a baby as it tries to walk and falls, before you know it they,re running like rabbits.
 

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Can I ask why you dove head first into this without having any kind of back ground at all?

Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking you. I commend your drive and your courage.

I'm just curious as to how this happened for you, why you made the decision, etc.

It would be kind of like if I jumped into say, the carpentry business having no carpentry skills. The bank would be foreclosing on my house within months.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Jimmy, your post made me laugh. Thanks.

Originally I was going to go into screen and pad printing. I was on the verge of spending tens of thousands of dollars for equipment and as I dug deeper into it I found out that it was quite messy and would take up a lot of room that I don't have. And there was the mention of needing a darkroom for something. It sounded like a lot of work, but I was only going to be printing words on things, not any kind of artwork. So my MS Word was really the only software that I needed at the time. I bought a pad printer and exposure unit that is still sitting unused. I have to go to Philadelphia for class on that.

Anyhow, I was having a heck of a time finding blanks for the pad printer. And while searching for blanks I stumbled on sublimation. I was sold. It was love at first sight. I did buy some basic sublimation software to fill in the gap (Hanes Sublimation Maker & Hanes T-shirt maker) while I learn the tougher software.

Why was I even thinking about it? I'm a registered nurse with a very bad back (compliments of lifting patients that are 3 times my size) and I need to find something else to do for a living that doesn't require going back to college. I'm just tired of being in pain all the time. This is something I can do. And I am learning it. Little bits at a time.

If you saw the first mug I made you'd probably wet your pants laughing. That first mug almost set the house on fire, too. Granted, I did reconsider sublimation at that time, but I'm glad I didn't. A few weeks ago I made my first name tag after destroying 10 of them in the process and on Friday I made 4 of them for the grandkids (My grandson has an identical set but his have his name on them).

These are 2 sided tags, by the way. There is an image on both sides, their cat, Tony on one side and Baron (their dog that died) on the other side. If you look closely at Baron's picture it looks like there is light coming from behind him, like he's looking down at them from heaven. Anyhow, I have discovered an artistic streak in me that I didn't know I had, and I'm having a ball making stuff. I take all my things into work to show the other nurses what I'm learning. Some are actually ordering stuff.

I just wish CorelDraw wasn't so complicated. But I am learning it, slowly. I just wish there was a faster way to learn it. Or find someone who could teach it to me.
 

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Tom, thanks for the link to the tutorials. I never thought to google them. For some reason I just assumed that everyone charges for that stuff. I am learning it. Two months ago I couldn't even make a mug or t-shirt. Today I'm drawing my own shapes (I didn't even use a template). Soon, I'll be a serious competitor. Ok, maybe not for a few years... but I'm working on it.
 

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The way i learned is by seeing a certain graphic and trying to duplicate it by googling for tutorials...
and at first it's like making a cake... you follow the directions but you don't know why... then little by little it starts to look like the pic in the tutorial... then after a few(hundred lol) tutorials... it will be like an extension of you... You will have an idea... then it will be... click,click,click and you will have a cool graphic...
It only took me 5 years to get really good at Photoshop...(at least i think im ok...haha?)

Graphics can be a great source of stress relief... just open Corel... and make whatever... click every filter and button and have fun...
 

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Don't forget www.youtube.com there are many corel tutorial videos on it. Look up Alex Galvez. He has some really good ones on just about everything.
I have been using Corel for years but any time I need to know something I just go there or use a search.

Lar
 

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Jimmy, your post made me laugh. Thanks.

Originally I was going to go into screen and pad printing. I was on the verge of spending tens of thousands of dollars for equipment and as I dug deeper into it I found out that it was quite messy and would take up a lot of room that I don't have. And there was the mention of needing a darkroom for something. It sounded like a lot of work, but I was only going to be printing words on things, not any kind of artwork. So my MS Word was really the only software that I needed at the time. I bought a pad printer and exposure unit that is still sitting unused. I have to go to Philadelphia for class on that.

Anyhow, I was having a heck of a time finding blanks for the pad printer. And while searching for blanks I stumbled on sublimation. I was sold. It was love at first sight. I did buy some basic sublimation software to fill in the gap (Hanes Sublimation Maker & Hanes T-shirt maker) while I learn the tougher software.

Why was I even thinking about it? I'm a registered nurse with a very bad back (compliments of lifting patients that are 3 times my size) and I need to find something else to do for a living that doesn't require going back to college. I'm just tired of being in pain all the time. This is something I can do. And I am learning it. Little bits at a time.

If you saw the first mug I made you'd probably wet your pants laughing. That first mug almost set the house on fire, too. Granted, I did reconsider sublimation at that time, but I'm glad I didn't. A few weeks ago I made my first name tag after destroying 10 of them in the process and on Friday I made 4 of them for the grandkids (My grandson has an identical set but his have his name on them).

These are 2 sided tags, by the way. There is an image on both sides, their cat, Tony on one side and Baron (their dog that died) on the other side. If you look closely at Baron's picture it looks like there is light coming from behind him, like he's looking down at them from heaven. Anyhow, I have discovered an artistic streak in me that I didn't know I had, and I'm having a ball making stuff. I take all my things into work to show the other nurses what I'm learning. Some are actually ordering stuff.

I just wish CorelDraw wasn't so complicated. But I am learning it, slowly. I just wish there was a faster way to learn it. Or find someone who could teach it to me.

congrats and the best of luck to you. You knew what you wanted and went after it, that is what life is all about but most people don't have the courage to try something new.
 

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Jimmy, your post made me laugh. Thanks.

Originally I was going to go into screen and pad printing. I was on the verge of spending tens of thousands of dollars for equipment and as I dug deeper into it I found out that it was quite messy and would take up a lot of room that I don't have. And there was the mention of needing a darkroom for something. It sounded like a lot of work, but I was only going to be printing words on things, not any kind of artwork. So my MS Word was really the only software that I needed at the time. I bought a pad printer and exposure unit that is still sitting unused. I have to go to Philadelphia for class on that.

Anyhow, I was having a heck of a time finding blanks for the pad printer. And while searching for blanks I stumbled on sublimation. I was sold. It was love at first sight. I did buy some basic sublimation software to fill in the gap (Hanes Sublimation Maker & Hanes T-shirt maker) while I learn the tougher software.

Why was I even thinking about it? I'm a registered nurse with a very bad back (compliments of lifting patients that are 3 times my size) and I need to find something else to do for a living that doesn't require going back to college. I'm just tired of being in pain all the time. This is something I can do. And I am learning it. Little bits at a time.

If you saw the first mug I made you'd probably wet your pants laughing. That first mug almost set the house on fire, too. Granted, I did reconsider sublimation at that time, but I'm glad I didn't. A few weeks ago I made my first name tag after destroying 10 of them in the process and on Friday I made 4 of them for the grandkids (My grandson has an identical set but his have his name on them).

These are 2 sided tags, by the way. There is an image on both sides, their cat, Tony on one side and Baron (their dog that died) on the other side. If you look closely at Baron's picture it looks like there is light coming from behind him, like he's looking down at them from heaven. Anyhow, I have discovered an artistic streak in me that I didn't know I had, and I'm having a ball making stuff. I take all my things into work to show the other nurses what I'm learning. Some are actually ordering stuff.

I just wish CorelDraw wasn't so complicated. But I am learning it, slowly. I just wish there was a faster way to learn it. Or find someone who could teach it to me.
Good stuff.

Keep at it and best of luck to you.
 
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