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Discussion Starter #1
Yeah... I'm just venting. I'm seriously considering selling my toyota. I can stitch stuff without layers or outlines fine. I should say, I use Stitch Era Universal. It seems it should do the job. I've tried some vectors and such, and it just seems like so much tweeking and screwing around to get the images right. I am building some techniques in the process. I admit, I'm probably just missing the fundamentals. I've never actually worked for or been mentored in embroidery... just trial and error at this point. OK... with that, I'll post a couple files out here. The first was just so I could test with something I could compare to a professional embroidered item I have. The second I created, and thought it would work ok, but when I try to transfer to the machine, it never completes... but it opens in the software fine. There's probably a million things wrong with this file. I'm guessing I butchered it from the original vector. Anyhow, any tips/advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Tips: Hang in there, it's not magic. :)
 
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Most of your fills have no underlay? I just looked at the Bucks one and other than a center underpath on a couple of things, I don't see any real underlays. Let me guess, your registrations are off when you stitch out the design?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If registrations off means that the colors don't line up... then yes. I will add underlays and try that. Thank you!
 

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digitizing is not something you can learn overnight. If you really want to learn check at strawberrystitch.com they offer training programs and books.

Don't give up!
 

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Jeremy,
It took me at least 2 years to be able to work past minimum wage or 5 hours on a design I could easily buy for 30-$40 from a pro. That was a while ago, but the point is you need to take the time and learn some basics in order to make the tools work for you. Have a pro do your designs, keep your machine humming and at the same time spend time looking at the file the Pro gives you so you can see what works. Learn to duplicate success. Underlay like Ted said is very important...know that "how, what and why" takes some thinking and knowing your substrate. Your tiny text(columns) is not even 3/4 of a millimeter wide. The standard embroidery needle is at least that. That's like me typing this note using my elbows. It's not going to happen.
You've got a good start, don't give up. Pick some easy parameters for name drops, simple designs and edits. Farm the harder stuff out and get you customer used to paying what it's worth, so that in a couple of years more of that cash can go in your pocket.

Ian
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you all for the tips, reality checks and encouragement. I do greatly appreciate it. I wish I didn't have a full time job along with this "hobby" ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Guess I'm going to have to break down and pay someone for digitizing in the meantime... do you guys have suggestions/recomendations for a reliable digitizer?
 

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At the very least you should win an award for the best thread title ever! I laughed so hard I cried!

If I were to offer one bit of advise it would be to NEVER touch the autodigitizing functions until after you've learned to digitize. I'm not familiar with your software at all so can't offer particulars but it looks like the entire design was autopunched. The lack of underlays and pull compensation would render the design useless unless you are sewing on some material that has absolutely no push or pull tendancies.

Keep experimenting. Every time you see a design that runs really well and looks great, take it apart and learn from it. Watch the underlays especially. They are the foundation of all good embroidery.

Make up a few basic designs like a series of circles with varying densities. Sew it out on different materials just to see the diferences in the way the materials push and pull. Over time you will develop a set of "recipes" of different settings for different materials that works for you.

It is more an art form than magic but with a solid plan of attack it can be mastered. Good luck!
 

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Guess I'm going to have to break down and pay someone for digitizing in the meantime... do you guys have suggestions/recomendations for a reliable digitizer?
I purchased digitizing software assuming I was going to be able to do it myself and boy was I wrong. I can do the basics but anything ..no way

I found $15 Flat Rate Digitizing

flat rate $15 for logos.. they are great, very helpful and very quick if you want any changes.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Liberty. The title was easy ;-) I like the circles idea... think I'm going to start banging some of those out today.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Aweseome FatKat!!! Thanks for listing the resourse. Now I don't have to learn digitizing ;-)
 

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You will learn a lot from watching a good design stitch out...so even though you are just going to buy the design watch it and see how they digitized it.
 

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Digtiizing takes patience and a strong understanding of fabric/thread/machine. Watch the designs sew out, see what others do. If you have a stock design collection, sew some out and see what they do that works and what doesn't.
 

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Liberty - you are right on the money! The title of this thread sucked me in, too!

I've been digitizing for almost 4 years now, and there are still lots of things I don't know. I outsourced digitizing for the first time last week. I used cheapdigitizing.com and the design stitched out BEAUTIFULLY! It was an 18,000 stitch left chest logo ...and the artwork was a total MESS to start with, so they certainly got my attention when it stitched out so nicely...and they also won my repeat business! It was a $1,200.00 sale, and the digitizing cost me $22. Money well spent!!
 

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Can i ask what Underlay is? I'm just learning all the terminology to go with my new hobby/business and that's one I hadn't seen.
 

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Underlay is adding stitches underneath the design. It becomes the foundation of the design and helps stabilize the fabric and backing.

If you compare it to painting, underlay is the primer that bonds the paint to the substrate...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Underlay is adding stitches underneath the design. It becomes the foundation of the design and helps stabilize the fabric and backing.

If you compare it to painting, underlay is the primer that bonds the paint to the substrate...
The primer analogy really puts it into perspective. Thanks.
 
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