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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a GT-541 on the way and am working on designs to be able to hit the ground running. I need to know a few things about creating art. I use Corel 13.

If a design has white in it how does the machine handle that? Ignore it, print a blank space or what?

What happens if you try to print a 10%, 15% black? Will that work and on what colors?

I was told all art needs to be in at least 300 x 300 dpi. I know the machine prints in 600 x 600 but am not sure what dpi to use for creating designs.

I am told all art needs to be done in RGB color. True?

Should I leave the designs as Corel files or convert to bitmaps before printing?

Thanks for any tips.
 

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If a design has white in it how does the machine handle that? Ignore it, print a blank space or what?
The GT-541 doesn't print white ink so any place that is white will be the "color" of the shirt.

What happens if you try to print a 10%, 15% black? Will that work and on what colors?
I don't understand this question. But here's a tip about printing on colored shirts. If the ink color is "DARKER" than the shirt color it should show up.

Also, you ABSOLUTELY "Can't" print on a black shirt. Forest green and Red will only show the "black" ink color

FYI: Shirt color affects the ink colors you print so if you try printing on a Dark shirt color "light ink colors" like yellow will not show up or be affect.

A suggestion given me when I first got my machine is to print the color pallet brother has on the machine on "EVERY POSSIBLE" color shirt you plan to offer. That way you can see what the ink will look like on that shirt and you can have those shirts as a example to show the customer.

I was told all art needs to be in at least 300 x 300 dpi. I know the machine prints in 600 x 600 but am not sure what dpi to use for creating designs.

I am told all art needs to be done in RGB color. True?
Its good to have high quality art but it can do 150 dpi files also. RGB format is recommended but some have printed in CMYK. What mode you print in will probably affect the printed look.

Should I leave the designs as Corel files or convert to bitmaps before printing?

Thanks for any tips.
You can print using any file format you like. I have printed from JPG, TIF, CDR, EPS, AI, you name it. As you get used to using your machine you will know what you feel most comfortable with. I usually used JPG but again I have printed using various formats.

Signed,
Angela H. aka Printchic
 

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sba55,

This web page should help explain to you the difference between a CMYK only print on colored garments and CMYK+White prints - Light v Dark Garments - MultiRIP GP dtg Print From RIP.

All dtg printers have the ability to print on 10% black or the other numbers you mentioned. This is just the opacity of the black ink. Think about it this way. If you desktop printer can print it... a dtg printer can do it.

As far as resolution, there are two types you need to know. First is the resolution of the artwork. Because we are printing on fabric that is not smooth, we are not able to hold the same higher resolutions (300 dpi) that you can typically get when printing on to a paper substrate. So as mentioned above by Printchic, you only need to have a graphic around 150 to 200 dpi. Now if you try to increase the size of the artwork that was originally 150 dpi, you will drop the dpi. So most people will create their artwork at 300 dpi and then drop it down right before they print it. This will also allow you to sell the artwork back to the customer so they can use if for their paper products (i.e. business cards, letter head,...) and for their website. The other type of resolution is the printing resolution. This resolution has to do with the detail that the print heads can fire out at. The print head resolution is almost always higher than the artwork resolution. So when you talk about the two resolutions, you are really talking about two completely different things.

Most people print out of RGB because this color mode tends to result in brighter graphics. As mentioned on this forum, converting artwork to RGB color mode will make the colors more saturated. This means that you are changing the colors though. So if you want to get the most accurate color based on what is in the graphic, you should not convert the artwork to RGB if it is in a different color mode (i.e. CMYK). All dtg printers have a printing software that will convert the software from any color mode using an ICC profile to get similar colors out of your printer.

Hope this clarifies your questions.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to everyone for the replys. I am pretty nervous about the difference between what I am looking at on my screen and what the image will look like on a shirt but experimentation will help out a lot.

I saw plenty of printed examples during the demo but realize they wouldn't show me anythinv that wasn't nice. I had them print some designs I did and the results were pretty good given that I just threw some things together.

This forum is an excellent source of information and I wa sure I could get some good help here.
 

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no machine, or method can do everything. Know what you CAN DO WELL and market to that. There is plenty of non black biz out there .

I have started printing on SanMar sport tek wicking shirts with the spray pretreat...really easy , and am moving into the $20 + price shirt, in addition to the $10 catagory. Since I can print 1 sample...they love seeing the finished item, and is much easier to sell.

note : wicking shirts have an air gap between fibers wider than a dense cotton shirt...so design knowing that. Fine designs will be a little blurrier than cotton.
 
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