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Discussion Starter #1
I use photoshop cs and I'm not sure of what the ave. size of a design to put on a shirt.
What is the size from side to side, the width. The length also, but the width is more important to me now.

Can anyone help me out so I know what to make them at to send for printing.
 

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It depends on the design I think. Some designs look good 7" wide, some look good 10" wide, some look good 12" wide.

What you should do is grab a ruler and put it on a t-shirt to see how big you want it to look on the garment.
 

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I went between nine and twelve inches wide for my first three designs. I like the way they turned out. Get some of your shirts, that you like and bought in the past, and measure them. That's probably your best bet along with putting a tape measure to a blank like Rodney said.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I got one on today and I think it's 10" wide. I put a sheet of paper to it and it was wider by 2 or so inches.
 

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You also have to consider shirt sizes. An 11" or 12" design that looks great on a XXL shirt might not look so good on a small. You have to find a happy medium that will work between the different shirt sizes you'll be using.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
good point. I guess a good design on a xxl would look pretty funny on a sm.
 

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One thing to look out for....when you're doing a circular design keep it about 10" max unless you want something really huge. Anything circular will ALWAYS appear larger than horizontally based or asymmetrical designs.
 

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i told my printer i wanted the design (horizontal) on one shirt to run approximately nipple to nipple on the men's and women's styles. out came the rulers. it was a good starting point ;)
 

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Make sure that you also have the right resolution. Generally for print work, you should have at least 300 dpi BUT this depends on the size of your image.

Also, as a rule, you can always size down but you can NEVER size up. So, if you're not sure, err on the side of caution and make the design larger than you think you wold actually use. You never know what size shirt you will need or where you could put the desing, so go bigger :D.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
are you talking 300 dpi based on the 10" ave. or 300 dpi period?
 

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I usually make my design sizes between 8-10". Depending on the shirt brand I plan to use, you can usually get the shirt specs on most shirt brand websites. If I'm printing on more than size range, I try & pick a sixe that'll work for all the sizes or else I'll have to pay for more than one set-up cost.
 

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Thank you. I knew they were vector, but I never hear anyone say they use it for their shirt designs and thought there was another major difference.

Thnanks!
 

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I never hear anyone say they use it for their shirt designs and thought there was another major difference.
Yep, lots of people use it for t-shirt designs. I think the only major differences are the vector vs raster and the different effects that might be photoshop specific.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
does vector or raster make a difference in screen pront?
 

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Buechee said:
does vector or raster make a difference in screen pront?
Vector is considered better for screen printing, though both are possible.
 
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