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Discussion Starter #1
I searched the forum and found most advice was;

1: T square it
2: fold shirt in half and crease a center line
3: Eye ball it

My question is, once I lay out my shirt i simply can't just T square it or eyeball it because I want to use a lot of unorthodox placements (like down the rib cage, collar bones, offset to the sides, etc...

Back to my question, once I lay out my shirt, measure everything up, can I use tailor's chalk or any type of marking pen so I know exactly where to place my logos? Will the chalk or markers affect the heat press (leave a stain on the shirt or the platens?) Any suggestions on chalk or markers that won't make an affect?

Thanks in advance.
 

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For the heat press, you should use a Teflon sheet or parchment paper to protect it. So, at the end of the day, you are only risking the shirt to test it. I would get a scrap shirt or swatch and give it a try.
 

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If you would like to use tailor's chalk to help you align your design on the shirt, I recommend you make a small mark above and below where you intend on placing the image. Place the image on the shirt, and then take a damp sponge/rag and remove the markings.
 

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I can't understand why people go out of there way to make things harder than they need to be ? Your not building a bridge, its a shirt ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you would like to use tailor's chalk to help you align your design on the shirt, I recommend you make a small mark above and below where you intend on placing the image. Place the image on the shirt, and then take a damp sponge/rag and remove the markings.
Thanks Eric, I think I'll give this a try this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I can't understand why people go out of there way to make things harder than they need to be ? Your not building a bridge, its a shirt ?
If it was one design centered on the chest / back or centered on one side of the chest, I understand that would be fairly simple.

But, keep in mind, I'm completely new to heat pressing shirts. I've pressed about 10 shirts total now. Some of the placement of the designs are in difficult spots (like vertically down one side of a shirt). It's really hard to get all the shirts to be uniform by just eyeballing and using a ruler since the shirts are spread out over a platen that is not the same size / shape as the shirt.

I just don't want to waste anymore shirts, ink, and sub paper while I'm getting experienced enough to eyeball and press.
 

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Don't always eyeball, if you have look at the "Knit" of the shirt sometimes its crooked you need to heat press the shirt first to make sure you get the shirt realigned so that fabric flows nice.

Take a look at some of your shirts before you press you will notice its not always ready to press. You should make a habbit of pre pressing your shirts for 3-5 seconds on low - medium pressure this also gets the moisture out but lets you "fold" the shirt fixing it if it is not aligned.

This makes sure the print goes on a straight shirt and not a crooked one.
 

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I searched the forum and found most advice was;

1: T square it
2: fold shirt in half and crease a center line
3: Eye ball it

My question is, once I lay out my shirt i simply can't just T square it or eyeball it because I want to use a lot of unorthodox placements (like down the rib cage, collar bones, offset to the sides, etc...

Back to my question, once I lay out my shirt, measure everything up, can I use tailor's chalk or any type of marking pen so I know exactly where to place my logos? Will the chalk or markers affect the heat press (leave a stain on the shirt or the platens?) Any suggestions on chalk or markers that won't make an affect?

Thanks in advance.
Wet erase markers, also commonly referred to as wet-wipe markers, can be used on any non-porous surface, which makes them great for a variety of materials. But wet-erase ink has a few major differences from typical dry erase markers. First, wet erase pens use a paste instead of an alcohol-based ink which makes the markings semi-permanent. This means that a normal whiteboard eraser will not remove the markings, but a simple damp cloth will remove it quite easily. Another advantage is that wet-erase markings will not fade or bubble under intense heat

I just found something from internet, that I thinks it might partly help you.

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