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Discussion Starter #1
If I want to make t-shirts with words only, would screen printing be better?

I don't want to cut around lettering when I print on t-shirts.

Also, does Hot Press not show up well on colored shirts or appear transparent?

I just want a quality clean looking shirt!
 

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Screen printing would be better if you were printing atleast 20-25 tees, i cut around letters on heat press all the time, you get used to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is there a huge quality difference?

It seems like most major sites screen print. I understand it is cheaper to start out with Heat Press, but I don't want my first customers to think the shirt is crap quality.

If everyone had the money, would they screen print vs. heat press?
 

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Our company uses the same plastisol inks...and we print letters, numbers, the whole nine yards...In my experience, plastisol ink transfers are superior in quality to inkjet transfers.

:)

-- Jimmy
 

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It's not apples to apples when comparing inkjet transfer papers to plastisol ink transfers for text. You need to compare it to the heat transfer vinyl material. If you're doing quantity of the same design order plastisol. However, if you are not doing bulk and want to cut custom text per order, use a cutter and heat transfer vinyl. I think if everyone had the money, they would offer both services. This way you can screen the bulk orders and heat press the "one-offs". Look and feel of the two technologies is similar. This is why the team names on the front of uniforms are usually screened in bulk and then heat pressed for the name & number, one at a time.
 

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OK, just so I understand.
I purchased the epson 86 and majic mix ink unit and want to do shirts with lettering and text. If I do this with Majic jet transfer paper there WILL be an outline on the shirts? I really do not want to cut out each letter.
As for the plastisol transfers. Is it plastisol paper or plastiol ink or both? If its ink can I use it with my epson printer?

Thanks
Jason
 

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Grayhead said:
OK, just so I understand.
I purchased the epson 86 and majic mix ink unit and want to do shirts with lettering and text. If I do this with Majic jet transfer paper there WILL be an outline on the shirts? I really do not want to cut out each letter.
As for the plastisol transfers. Is it plastisol paper or plastiol ink or both? If its ink can I use it with my epson printer?

Thanks
Jason
There will be an outline depending on what paper you use and what color garment you apply it to. On darks you use opaque paper and you'll see whatever you don't cut out around the letters, unless you cut right up to them.

Plastisol is a screenprinting ink applied to transfer paper, then applied to garments in the same way you do with your inkjet transfers. You'd need to purchase these from a printer by supplying your designs. This is probably the best way to go for designs that are mainly text.

B.
 

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Another option may be sublimation transfers. There is no cutting required. What is required is polyester. The clincher is that you cannot print to darks (there are opaque backers, but I have found nothing I like). You can dye the fabric darker. I commonly use black only to dye to the lime green safety shirts. This works fine. Hanes and Vapor both have nice shirts for dye sublimation.

You can print full color with no art/separation fees and with no minimums!! Blanks will cost a bit more, but the graphic will never crack, peel or fade.

Ron

 

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Everything has it's advantages and disadvantages, of course. The disadvantage of Dye Sublimation (which cprvh just recommended) is the cost - one company holds the rights to the process and charges excesivelly for the right to use it, basically.

If you use Magic Jet paper on white (and possibly light ash) t-shirts, you will not really see any outline at all (unless you really look for it). This assumes you cut out your design; this does not mean meticulously cutting out every letter exactly - it means cutting close to your design, about 1/8 of an inch away from the design is a good aim.
 

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I'd imagine it would be possible to use a vinyl cutter for this process as well. Print it, then place into the vinyl cutter and have it cut everything out for you. Then you could just weed and press.

Correct me if i am wrong.

Zac
 

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In essence you can use the vinyl cutter to cut around your pre printed text transfers. However the transfer paper must be an opaque paper. And you must mask the image to pull it from the paper pre-spaced and ready to apply. If you are just doing single color text for low number runs, you will be better off with the heat transfer vinyl. That way everything is mounted on a mylar carrier and ready to apply.
 
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