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I'm pretty new to the biz and I'm running into problems with curing (amongst other things.) I did a wash test and realized that almost half of the ink from the design was flaking off.

The design was in black ink on a grey organic cotton shirt.

I did only one print, then cured with my heat gun, holding it over each area 4-5 inches and for 20 seconds, continuously moving over the area.

I'm using International Coatings plastisol black ink and a Wagner 1200 watt heat gun. I'm wondering if anyone has a better idea about how long I should be curing each area for.

I don't have money for a flash dryer or conveyor dryer. Eventually, I will definatly get both but for now, I will have to make the heat gun work.

I'm also thinking about flashing it and then putting it in my conventional oven for 45 seconds or so but I didn't know if that works or what temperature to set the oven to. Any ideas or advice is helpful.
 

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T-shirt ink cures when it reaches 320 degrees for at least one minute, another method you could try is wax paper and an iron, that used to work for me back in the 80's - just remember 320 for 1 minute at least.
 

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I'll second the iron as a cheap set, works a treat... as above 320 for 1 minute (or if using waterbased check the container, my waterbase are 40 sec @ 300)
 

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The oven will work! Use to do this when I was starting out. I would suggest testing a shirt. Oven can vary in temp.. Also if you can invest in t thermometer.. Do it! This will save you guessing. The oven should be around 360 usually at the desired final temp. Let the oven reach temp that using a cookie sheet place the shirt on and watch the temp!! I can't stress watching the temp. sometimes the digital thermometers with the cord that you can leave in your oven work the best and you can watch the temp without having too keep the door open as much! Really this will take time to master but once you do you will be flying. I strongly recommend testing a shirt and your oven temp and going form there!
 

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T-shirt ink cures when it reaches 320 degrees for at least one minute, another method you could try is wax paper and an iron, that used to work for me back in the 80's - just remember 320 for 1 minute at least.

I'll try this today and see if it works. Do you just lay down the wax paper over the print and iron it? Does the wax paper smear or distort the wet ink? Are there any repercussions for going longer than a minute? Thanks all!!!
 

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A lot worked better in the 80's. One of my favorite decades.

LOL!!!!!!!!!!! I HEAR YA!!!!

Now, nothing works...no hair for the comb, back don't work right 'cause of the pain in it, eyes work best with glasses attached, belt needs more holes to loosen, pants for said belt needs to be bigger....and the list goes on and on!!!!!
 

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I use my kitchen oven for curing since I'm starting up my business in my flat but it works fine. I usually crank it up to 180ºC for about 90 secs but I have to be careful about the thermostat switching on and off. I burnt a few shirts in the beginning but I sold them to some friends and family anyway so I'm getting my money back.

for me the oven is a good cheap solution. I was also thinking about buying an old oven on ebay and adapting a conveyor belt but that's a idea at the moment nothing more.


good luck from madrid.
 

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A lot worked better in the 80's. One of my favorite decades.
ROFLMAO I hear you!

Now.. back to the topic. Maybe you would be better off looking at changing to waterbased for what you are doing? Then you can air dry on a clothes rack etc and iron set fairly easily. Just my opinion so not worth a pinch of salt but waterbased seems a lot easier when you don't have the right equipment/technique. Seems to be more tolerant.

Then once you can afford a flash unit you could move on to plastisol.
 

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I'll try this today and see if it works. Do you just lay down the wax paper over the print and iron it? Does the wax paper smear or distort the wet ink? Are there any repercussions for going longer than a minute? Thanks all!!!
instead of using wax paper, use tin foil with the shiny side down. This will get your temperature hotter than wax paper could.

This is how I use to cure my water based inks. Not sure if you can get it hot enough for plastisol though. It's worth a try I guess...

oh ya, flash it dry with your heat gun first. Dont ever do this to a wet print.
 
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