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Curing water based ink without scorching. How is this accomplished? and with what ? I have tried the iron method with undesired results. The ink mfr recommends using a iron on hottest setting for 3-5 min. 40 seconds will scorch and the ink will not set. When washed the ink fades.

Please help.:eek:
 

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Thanks Rodney.I searched the threads but must have missed that one. I have a bunch of the water based ink left from a Boy Scout project and wanted to use it up and start using plastisol inks.
 

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I use speedball water based ink and have never had a problem with scorcing the ink. Are you placing a piece of heat transfer paper between your shirt and iron? I've used that for sometime now and have tested some shirts by washing them over and over and they have not faded or cracked.
 

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Thanks Rodney.I searched the threads but must have missed that one.
No worries. That post describing the air dry method was actually made AFTER you posted your question. I just happened to see it and thought it was a perfect fit for your question :)
 

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crazy i was just looking for somthing like this i want to do all over prints but my dryer belt is only 20 inches wide....and my flash is 16x16 so hopfully this will work
 

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Hi Guys,

I am having the same issue with curing my water based ink prints. I cannot afford to buy a flash unit so I have been experimenting with heat gun for 2-3 minutes and/or the iron for 2-3 minutes. The shirts are still bleeding when I wash them. Is there a time limit for when you cure the shirts after printing? Can it be done a few hours after the printing or does it need to be done immediately? Also I tested the curing with hand-washing, the shirts do not bleed when they get wet only when the soap is applied they begin to bleed.

Water based inks come with a self curing additive but I was told it has a short shelf life so you must be prepared to use up all the ink immediately if you want to use it, is there another additive that does not compromise the shelf life of the ink that I could be using? Any advise on how I can improve my methods would be greatly appreciated, thanks!
 

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You're not curing your shirts thoroughly.
When the manufacturers say 2-3 minutes, they mean at a constant.
When you're ironing, you have to move the iron so you don't scorch your shirt...therefore you're not at a constant temp.
When I screenprint I use a conveyor dryer and a flash dryer, but when I do my airbrush work on clothing, I have always ironed them. Normally it has taken around 20 minutes for one shirt.
The artwork lasts for years, outlasting the shirts themselves. I've got and seen work (that I've done for customers) that is from the late 80's- early 90's that still looks like almost new.
Cure more and longer!!!
 

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Yes you can use a heatpress.
With your waterbased inks, I would air dry (heat gun, etc) them first, then use a cover sheet (teflon or a clean cotton pillow case even) and heat press.
Experimentation is the nature of the beast, you know?
With curing and with printing techniques.
Have at it :)
 

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I'm having the same bleeding problems and figured I wasn't curing the shirts for long enough. 20 min curing time doesn't seem cost effective, however. That's too much time to spend on 1 shirt. I guess you have to do that in the beginning until you can afford a dryer.

I'm going to try heat gunning for a five minutes and then go to the iron for another five and see what happens.
 

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Your best bet if you cant afford the dryer is to let them air dry overnight then iron them the next day. The less moisture in the ink the shorter your cure time.
 

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Have you tried talking with the manufacturer or your supplier? Curing time varies. There are waterbased inks that are cured with irons in about 20 seconds only with the longer drying inks taking more than twice as long so maybe your supplier will be in the best position to help. To my mind, an iron steady in an area for more than 5 seconds(high) is enough to risk scorching the shirt.
 

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Thanks for the replies I finally got it. 10 min heat gun, even coverage, 5 min iron, even coverage. It's cured for sure. As far as my supplier, they only seem to carry 1 water based ink. I could still talk to them though.

Thanks,
 

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Thanks for the replies I finally got it. 10 min heat gun, even coverage, 5 min iron, even coverage. It's cured for sure. As far as my supplier, they only seem to carry 1 water based ink. I could still talk to them though.

Thanks,
hi sir! with the length of time you mentioned, i'm sure ink is cured. but, 15min is too long to cure one shirt. water based inks are mostly used by majority here in the philippines. here's how i cure my prints: i use iron (set to hottest setting, for cotton shirts) to cure my prints. i cover the print with a thin cotton cloth (cut from tshirt:D), then press one part of the design for about 5secs. then another part for another 5secs. do this until whole design is ironed. try to stretch the design and see if it cracks. if it does not crack, it's cured. you will actually see if it's cured if the design turns a little darker and harder when you touch it.:)
 

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Coming across an old post, let me clarify that for most(regular) waterbase inks used in the Philippines, 20-30 seconds seems more than enough(no catalyst). Medium drying inks, those that does not clog screens as easily cures in about 45-60 seconds. Longer drying inks that falls into the matsui 301 evo class for 2 minutes. (Note: these are matsui evo type inks, not matsui. I think matsui recommends 2.5-3 minutes).
 
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