T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
690 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I maybe wrong on this, but I remember reading it somewhere that plastisol ink needs to reach about 320 degrees for a few seconds for it be cured. Is it possible to use a heat press, like Digital Knight, to cure the ink?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,202 Posts
Did you know you can cure your shirts in a kitchen oven?

You could cure your shirts under a heat press, but it's not ideal. The first thing to understand is, you can't put any pressure on it at all, it can't even touch the shirt, otherwise you would end up with a mess.

The second thing is, it's not very efficient. It would take awhile to get the temperature up to where it needs to be. If you are using a clamshell (the kind that when open is angled up), then you would be getting inconsistent heat from front to back. If you were using a swing away, it would be more level to the shirt and better consistency with heat, but most people don't have swing-aways because they are more costly.

Personally, I wouldn't recommend it, but it can be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
194 Posts
My press is adjustable. I can actually raise the top platen so that it doesn't touch when I close it. I have never tried this though. I just use my flash dryer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,202 Posts
I'm sure it can be done, the problem is quality. When using heat transfer paper on top of the print and then pressed leaves a couple of problems.

1. It gives you a really smooth and shiny surface. This makes it appear as a transfer instead of a direct print.

2. With larger deposits of ink, it will press down and give a softer edge instead of nice crisp lines and edges.

With every print that you make, you're goal is repeat customers. If you cannot get repeat customers then your company may never grow to it's potential. You may have steady sales but it needs to be constant. If you ever stop selling, the business dries up very quickly. With repeat customers, when you stop selling, your company stops growing nearly as quick, but you have a constant flow of business coming because of your repeat customers and referrals.

I've always figured if you want to do things in a hobby manner, there's nothing wrong with that, but it's never what it could be. If you want to make a business out of it, then use the correct tools for the job.

Just my 2
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top