T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So as some of you may have read the thread about heat pressing onto different materials other than tshirts (i.e. burlap, canvas, etc)...well I did a test in that thread using JPSS and canvas material as well as burlap. See the results here: http://www.t-shirtforums.com/heat-press-heat-transfers/t60040.html

After doing that, I thought to myself, it would be cool if I could just print DIRECTLY onto my canvas material, esp. since I haven't purchased a plotter/cutter yet, so the polymer really shows thru on the material :(

Well I gave it a try, and I think it looks awesome, this is using canvas material, specifically duck cloth, and my Epson 1400, OEM inks. I'm really happy with the results...I plan to use this method for my hangtags, let me know what you think
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
So you just ran it though your printer canvas and all no transfer paper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
So this one got my attention, just had to try it...
I experimented on three different fabrics: Light cotton woven, white cotton t shirt and burlap with an Epson C88+.

First I cut a piece of fabric to fit a piece of card stock

cut to size.jpg

Then ironed it and sprayed the card stock with ez tak and attached the fabric

ez tak.jpg

The light cotton went through great but the t shirt fabric caught on the edges

tfab before.jpg

I cured this by ironing the fabric to the card stock with the ez tak so that it was really flat and stuck well.
Then even the burlap went through ok, the print head did drag on the leading edge a little but not bad for a very thick fabric.
Here are some after pictures.

These pics were taken after washing with bleach. I only tried black and washed immediately after printing and heat setting. It seems most of the color stayed, the light cotton (orange) faded a little, maybe it would hold better if it was on the fabric longer than a few minutes before washing :rolleyes: Impatient...

l I used regular photo setting on the printer. I only had a very coarse burlap on hand I'm sure a tighter weave burlap would work better and look more like Tasha's hang tag.

tfab after.jpg orange after.jpg burlp after 1.jpg

I also tried on a piece of my nylon flag fabric, didn't work at all! Simply ran all over and did not soak in.

nylon.jpg

I don't know yet what I will use this for but I thought it was really cool :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,964 Posts
First I cut a piece of fabric to fit a piece of card stock

Then ironed it and sprayed the card stock with ez tak and attached the fabric
If you use freezer paper it should go through the printer easier and, also, you won't have to use an adhesive to attach your fabric.
Just iron your fabric onto the shiny side of the freezer paper and it will stick just enough but will be easy to remove.
I've not printed on fabric this way but recently read about doing this using freezer paper for a backing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
Pigment ink should hold help they are water proof.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
on the tests above I used Ink Jet Carts Ultra II pigment inks in refillable carts. They are definitely waterproof and hold up to bleach well.

But good point Lewis... I don't think anybody will wash their hang tags... who knows someone may find another use for this info. :D :D:D(just love that grin makes me smile!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So you just ran it though your printer canvas and all no transfer paper
Yep, just ran it thru the printer directly, of course trim the edges as neatly as possible, cut to your desired width, and print. There is an option to spray glue a sheet of printer paper to the back, but I didn't do this, and it worked just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
If you use freezer paper it should go through the printer easier and, also, you won't have to use an adhesive to attach your fabric.
Just iron your fabric onto the shiny side of the freezer paper and it will stick just enough but will be easy to remove.
I've not printed on fabric this way but recently read about doing this using freezer paper for a backing.
Wow that's an awesome idea....I thought about the standard printer paper, but not freezer paper, thanks for the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I depends on how your printer feeds. I tried several pieces of fabric without backing and they just will not feed in the c-88.
Oh really? I have a 1400 and a C120, haven't tried the C120 yet, but for those that have the C88's that's definitely good info! Thanks, Cathy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
Oops, i mistakingly thought they were neck labels.

But if you are printing on canvas type material, isn't there a risk of damaging your print heads?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Oops, i mistakingly thought they were neck labels.

But if you are printing on canvas type material, isn't there a risk of damaging your print heads?
Hi Henry,
I can only base my opinion off of my experimentation and testing with this, and I have not had any issues with the print heads, Now grant it, I have only tested the duck cloth (canvas), as the texture isn't too coarse, and it's not too thick. I wouldn't recommend this for fabrics such as burlap, or the more coarse, thicker materials of course. But I am definitely not the printer expert here, maybe someone else can chime in? :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
I'd also be concerned with anything that had a lot of lint. But I'm not really a printhead guy either. You could get information from the DTG printers though, as they're pretty much the printhead experts :) This is basically a lo-fi form of the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,211 Posts
I tried onto regular canvas material onetime and it smeared. But you do know that they sell pretreated canvas for inkjets, right? Not sure how the costs compare.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top