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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, before the flaming starts..

I KNOW that I can only do 4"x4"

I KNOW that it's a slow hobby machine, and not a "real embroidery machine"

I KNOW that I'm going to need to rethread it on every color.

I know I have to buy a separate hoop for hats

BUT

I'm only going to be using it for simple pocket logos, names on uniforms, hats, etc.. quick and easy things that I don't want to have to send out every time.

I doubt I'm going to be even during peak time, doing more than 2-3 dozen items a week (if even close to that)

I Don't have thousands of dollars to spend on a "real" machine (or the type of business coming in to justify getting one, I'll ship out anything that exceeds my usage on something small)

I already have a company that does vectorizing, that will do the .pes files I need.

My questions are:
I'm reasonably inexperienced with embroidery, what other issues/limitations can I plan on running into?

Are there any other machines that would be better suited for what I'm going to be doing (that are in a comparable price range)

What are the quality factors (other than size/speed/needle colors) that a small hobby machine like this would differ from something higher end?

any other constructive comments?

ok, go.
 

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Bill,
Your going to waste your money.... You need at least a six needle machine.. Also you have to be computer savvy and be mechanically inclined... Most embroidery jobs are small amounts. If you can't digitize and can't fix your machine you can't make it... Been there done that..... Don't mean to rain on your parade just giving honest advice....
 

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You're far better off subcontracting out, even for small jobs. That machine is going to make you pull your hair out.

Better yet, consider extra income jobs this summer. $8000 for an industrial machine sounds like a lot, but a weekend job will bring that in and you can then focus on making money.

Seriously avoid hobby machines. I played with one a friend's wife let me borrow, and I considered blowing it up and reimbursing her for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
well my option is not spending thousands of dollars on a machine, especially since I'm still struggling to get the screen printing business running, I'd buy a DTG before I'd spend that kind of money on a embroidery machine.

and I really hate sending out half a dozen shirts to have names put on them, when it's something I could do in-house.

at the business I'd generate from having even a large scale machine, with what I'd project at my current state of business, it would take me 6 to 8 months, just to bring in enough income to pay for the SE400, a large scale machine? a few years.. not something I could currently budget for.

I still think I'm going to get one, a few hundred I could justify, even if it's wasted, I am VERY computer savvy, and reasonably technically inclined. I'd say I could repair 95% of anything I'd come across..

I do appreciate the input, but they didn't directly answer any of the questions I asked..

so unless anybody has any answers to the concerns I addressed....
 

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Bill, you obviously understand the drawbacks, so YES, you will be able to do what you are wanting to do - it will just be more time-consuming than the industrial machines. I don't know the machine you are looking at (I still use my Bernina 330, even tho' I now have an SWF that is used MOST of the time), but go to the various sewing shops in your area and see what they have. Get the sales lady to do a demo for you, and you can look at the stitch quality, speed, noise etc. Do NOT be pushed into taking a machine that does regular sewing as well as embroidery (unless you feel the stitch quality is phenomenally better). Find out if the machine comes with several fonts(which you could resize). Get one that works with a regular USB stick - and doesn't need an extra "Magic Box" and special design card. Make sure the hoop is STABLE during a stitchout. Find out how you get to the bobbin if the thread runs out during the stitching. Does it come with more than one hoop size. (the Bernina came standard with 2 hoop sizes. Does it have a cutting facility when it finishes a colour, or must you do that as well. They are machines that need "baby-sitting", as they don't stop when something goes wrong. Doing "floppy" hats is not a big deal - but doing caps is not worth the effort.
Just GO FOR IT! You can always sell it, or give it to a family member, when you have outgrown it.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
(I still use my Bernina 330, even tho' I now have an SWF that is used MOST of the time)
does the bernina 330 do embroidery? that's in the same price range, and if there was a more recommended machine in the same price range, I would definitely consider that..
 

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The Bernina Deco 330 is JUST an embroidery machine, but it has been replaced by the Deco 340, which takes the USB stick (altho' I think that should only be 1Gig). I think Bernina also has some free software that allows you to change designs of other formats to the EXP format read by the 340. I speak under correction, as I have their designer software. It really is worth going to see the different machines in action. We have a brand here that I wouldn't take as a present!!
 
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