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I'm glad you are familiar and OK with a manufacturer not honoring their warranty-- but I'm not sure everyone is aware of this.
Who ISN'T aware of this? This has been the case with all printer manufacturers since the advent of printers. Use a generic printer cartridge or ink or toner and your warranty is void. Even refilling an existing oem cartridge at an Office Max will void the printer warranty.

This was the case 25 years ago and is still the case today.
 

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Who ISN'T aware of this? This has been the case with all printer manufacturers since the advent of printers. Use a generic printer cartridge or ink or toner and your warranty is void. Even refilling an existing oem cartridge at an Office Max will void the printer warranty.

This was the case 25 years ago and is still the case today.
The life cycle of a human still keeps going after you lol. There are new people every day that get to an age where they buy their first printer or want to use third-party inks/carts and are not aware of the warranty or it's not the first thing that comes to mind, even though it may be printed in BOLD type on the product box itself (who reads the box/manual anyway? lol). There are even those who have purchased multiple printers but have always used OEM inks due to habit but then all of sudden use 3rd party inks/carts thinking nothing of it.

Just because it's "common sense" to you, doesn't meant it is to the next person. Millions of people learn something new every day due to inexperience.
 

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I've mentioned this in previous printer posts, and it's worth repeating here.

We need to be of the mindset that a printer is a consumable product, just like your ink and transfer paper. Yet, most think of them as durable goods. They're not.

Printers don't last forever (or very long for that matter) yet we have an expectation that they should.

You spend more money on ink than you do on a printer. Case in point, the Epson P600 can be bought for $770 on Amazon. The ink system alone from Conde costs $700. Once 1 cartridge is refilled, you've paid more for ink than the printer.

Just like you price your sublimation work based on how many prints you'll get from a container of ink, we also price our sublimation work with the assumption that we will need to buy a printer once a year when the warranty expires.

That means if you're doing 10,000 prints on a $770 printer, 8 cents of every print needs to be set aside for a new printer in a year.

If you adopt that mindset, you will mind as little about replacing a printer as you do replacing a cartridge of ink. And you'll have the money earned to buy a new one.
 

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I've mentioned this in previous printer posts, and it's worth repeating here.

We need to be of the mindset that a printer is a consumable product, just like your ink and transfer paper. Yet, most think of them as durable goods. They're not.

Printers don't last forever (or very long for that matter) yet we have an expectation that they should.

You spend more money on ink than you do on a printer. Case in point, the Epson P600 can be bought for $770 on Amazon. The ink system alone from Conde costs $700. Once 1 cartridge is refilled, you've paid more for ink than the printer.

Just like you price your sublimation work based on how many prints you'll get from a container of ink, we also price our sublimation work with the assumption that we will need to buy a printer once a year when the warranty expires.

That means if you're doing 10,000 prints on a $770 printer, 8 cents of every print needs to be set aside for a new printer in a year.

If you adopt that mindset, you will mind as little about replacing a printer as you do replacing a cartridge of ink. And you'll have the money earned to buy a new one.
Exactly. These printers are inexpensive and essentially disposable.

Even a $15k F2000 or $250k Kornit must be depreciated over its useful life, else $250k is a lot of $$$$$$ to flush.
 

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Cobra sublimation inks with WF1100 printer - that is what I've been using. Thanks for your information here, I'll proabably experiment with the Reveal S paper when I have a chance. I've got a newer Epson as well, and some older ones too. LOL! Looks like an old car lot around here, but for printers. :)
 

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I purchased the sample pack of Reveal S, but no matter what I do, the results are horrible. I've waisted a few sheets and tshirts trying to get the transfer to come out right. Any suggestions on what I could do? I've pressed for 385 degrees for 18 seconds, I've increased the heat, just in case. I've tightened the press so much where it lifts off the table when I try pressing. No matter what I do, I can't get it to come out right.
 

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Here's a few photos....using epson printer "cobra" inks, photoshop elements 12, and a dk20S.

We prepressed for 8 seconds, lint rolled, and heavy pressure for 18 seconds and hot peel. very good color transfer and hand isn't as heavy as an ink jet transfer. waiting on the first wash now...
Wondering how the transfer washed. Much fading after 1 or more washes?
 

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I have used the Reveal S twice, both times after pressing looked really good.
One was on a baby gown, the gown has been washed twice and is beginning to peel/crack/fade.
The other was on a t-shirt, the tshirt has faded so badly you cannot hardly read it any longer. I pulled it out of the dryer thinking it was actually turned inside out.
I made both of these for myself, so I could test them before using them on products in my store. With the results I've had, I'm afraid to put them on a custom order.
Anyone else had a fading problem? Or suggestions for what I am doing wrong?
 
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