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Please give me some advice. I've been researching for a month and it's giving me a headache.
Maybe we should start from the beginning. Do you really need 800 designs? I mean, really? That's mind-boggling.

If you did a deep dive, would you find that a large percentage of your sales are from a limited number of designs? And if you took care of that larger percentage with more efficient printing methods, that vinyl wouldn't be so bad on what's left?

And honestly, if you are averaging 75 garments a day, why are you doing the weeding and not hiring someone? You obviously can afford it. :)

Just throwing ideas out there.
 

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Please give me some advice. I've been researching for a month and it's giving me a headache.
"I feel your pain ..."

I tend to research things to death myself, and am doing so now with how to ship mugs. Reality is that there is seldom a perfect answer, just a variety of less-bad options. It really comes down to which poop-sandwich you would rather deal with. You may like the "flavor" of DTG better than vinyl, or you may be sad that you paid $20K to exchange one set of well-understood issues for a brand new set of issues that you need to hurry up and learn how to overcome.

I suggest doing some real-world research. Order yourself a couple of preprinted samples of white laser transfers and heat press them yourself. Order DTG printed shirts of a couple of your designs; might be a place at the mall that can do it, else can setup a Printful account. Order a Plastisol sample and press that. Then wash the hell out of them and see if you are satisfied with the look and durability of any of those methods.

Other outside the box suggestions that are not miracle cures, but may give you a bit of extra breathing room. Maybe raise your prices? If you can't keep up with demand, raise prices until supply and demand balance with less work producing the same $. The suggestion above to tweak your cuts for easier/quicker weeding might be worth the time it takes, at least for your better selling designs and when creating anything new going forward. And consider getting Plastisol transfers for any "evergreen" designs that sell consistently.

EDIT I have around 100 designs that I, more or less, screen print on demand (which is a somewhat crazy thing to do). Some of my designs go in and out of vogue with the news/political cycle, so I hang onto those through the slow/no sales times. But I could drop around 50 and not miss much by way of day-to-day sales. I also do a hybrid screen-print/sublimation/transfer process that is more amenable to printing one-ofs and low volume, but I'm painting outside the lines with that process, so can't recommend it as a "sane" solution for others. Point being, I understand the general predicament and have given it a lot of thought.
 

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another option for white is koncert-t's laser paper by neenah, might be worth a trial or two
EDIT - you will need a color laser printer with these though, not just a b&w

check some of these threads below for more info on it:
 

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another option for white is koncert-t's laser paper by neenah, might be worth a trial or two
again you only need a b&w laser printer with this paper
This is very similar to the Forever Flexsoft transfers, and gives very similar results.
Do you want your shirts to look like this after 25 washes?
Also note that the washes mentioned in the video are not "regular washes".
 

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This is very similar to the Forever Flexsoft transfers, and gives very similar results.
-----
Do you want your shirts to look like this after 25 washes?
Also note that the washes mentioned in the video are not "regular washes".
your post reminded me that the trick with the koncert t's is to print in the same color as the substrate,
and also to test different toner densities for your specific printer
i think it is in that long thread i posted a couple of posts up, but here is an overview below:


Can achieve true white!
In order to achieve true white you have to do 2 things: First, print in the same color as your shirt. So if you want white on purple shirts, print your graphics is PURPLE to match the shirt color. If you have a red shirt print all red graphics, etc. Secondly, do a test print in gradient scale. I designed a sample page of ten identical boxes, the first box had 100% black, the second box had 90% black, third 80%, etc. All the way down to 10% color. I printed all these boxes on one sheet of koncert tee paper. My first press, I made the paper sandwich. The two sheets peel apart beautifully. I then pressed the transfer onto a scrap t-shirt (in the same color as my print). Note which box shows the true white color best. For my printer is was the 50% box. So now I can save toner by only printing 50% toner and achieve excellent white results.
 

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your post reminded me that the trick with the koncert t's is to print in the same color as the substrate,
The same apply for the Forever Flexsoft transfers.
They are very similar products, but in my opinion not durable enough for retail.
You can make a quick buck, but you will not have repeat customers.
 

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The same apply for the Forever Flexsoft transfers.
They are very similar products, but in my opinion not durable enough for retail.
You can make a quick buck, but you will not have repeat customers.
well, that is not good

like mentioned above, maybe get plastisol transfers for your top sellers,
and incorporate some of the tricks for weeding htv for the rest (improvise, overcome and adapt)
 

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I bought a cheap laser printer & the Forever papers & it’s a huge improvement over weeding ! It’s been a year & no complaints from customers about durability. I highly recommend it for complex designs. You can even do multi color jobs.
If you’re staying with vinyl, perhaps eliminate the more miserable fonts? I refuse to use PITA fonts for vinyl like papyrus, Algerian (there is a copycat w/o all the wispy bits), bleeding cowboy, etc.
 

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Hello friends,
I've been printing t shirts for about 1 year and I was unaware that there was such a helpful forum.

There are a few things I want to ask,

I receive an average of 50-100 orders per day and working with vinyl makes me incredibly tired.
I print mostly (95%) white and simple designs. (For example "BEST HUSBAND" text)

1- How much ink will it cost if I print an average of 12 inch "BEST FRIEND" text in white on a black t-shirt (3001 Bella Canvas Black) with good quality.

2- Do I need to buy $15,000 DTGs? Or can I get simpler devices? (I'm open to your advice)
I use Forever Flexsoft Lazer printer self weeding transfer paper for runs of 100 shirts and various designs. Just like vinyl without weeding and can print complicated designs. I use an HP M254dw lazer printer. Google the flex paper site to learn how to use it. There are many sites to learn from. Much cheaper than a $15,000 DTG
 

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Hello friends,
I've been printing t shirts for about 1 year and I was unaware that there was such a helpful forum.

There are a few things I want to ask,

I receive an average of 50-100 orders per day and working with vinyl makes me incredibly tired.
I print mostly (95%) white and simple designs. (For example "BEST HUSBAND" text)

1- How much ink will it cost if I print an average of 12 inch "BEST FRIEND" text in white on a black t-shirt (3001 Bella Canvas Black) with good quality.

2- Do I need to buy $15,000 DTGs? Or can I get simpler devices? (I'm open to your advice)
Please give me some advice. I've been researching for a month and it's giving me a headache.
You should buy plastisol transfers. www.613originals.com has 1 color for $.15 per transfer no minimums.
 

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Back when I had a brick and mortar we did half screenprinting jobs and the other half a combination of vinyl or DTG. I waited a decade to finally jump in the DTG boat. Researched, went to trade shows, waited for the quality to keep going up and finally jumped in. DTG is what I used for full color designs or really detailed designs. Always stuck with vinyl for simple white on color designs. I also had employees to do the majority of the weeding though. As other have mentioned DTG can be a huge pain in the rear. You have to be your own tech and I spent many a tearful week trying to solve yet another problem with the white. That is a major piece of having a DTG machine for white ink. The maintenance is relentless and if the ind blows a certain way you’ll find yourself on your back (literally) staring into the underbelly of your machine trying to figure out what else went wrong. For all the one offs and size changes you require vinyl does seem best as far as washability and stress and cost. I made it a habit when doing regular customers simple orders to cut two or more depending on how it fit on the roll and save them for next time. Then file them away. You could start a filing system with the extras and after awhile you’ll have quite a few ready to go. Also, if you have top sellers you could precut when your slow that could save you time as well. Since moving home I’ve switched to plastisol transfers for some of my regular customers to have on hand, but I’d still go to vinyl for longetivity. Someone mentioned the ez weed table which helps a bit. And font choice as mentioned definitely helps as well! Best of luck.
 

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You should buy plastisol transfers. www.613originals.com has 1 color for $.15 per transfer no minimums.
Plus $25 setup fee... so are around $3 if you only need 10 copies, or $1 if you need 30.

I bought a cheap laser printer & the Forever papers & it’s a huge improvement over weeding ! It’s been a year & no complaints from customers about durability.
1. Are you using these for t-shirts or something else?
2. Any repeat customers?
 
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