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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A couple of queries, please:

1. Just wondering if screenprinters usually require vector artwork to be colour separated? I can probably work out how to do it, given extended time frowning over tutes and manuals, but if it's not necessary, would be good to avoid this task...

2. I read somewhere that any text in an Illusrator vector design should be submitted to the printer in outline. I have only heard the term "outline" in this context, so again, am some hours away from swotting up to understand what the term means, and how to apply it to a line of text in a design I otherwise have completed. Again, if it's not necessary, I would like to save myself the time and effort. My budget demands, however, that I minimise costs, so if necessary, I would prefer to work it out myself to be sure my artwork is 100% printer-ready and does not incur any art adjustment charges at printing stage. Any advice gratefully accepted.
 

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1-No, most shops will do it themselves.

2- All text needs to be converted to curves.
The software will do it, just a couple of mouse clicks.
Wiith Corel Draw (what I use) just right click on the test and from the popup
menu left click "Convert To Curves". Thats all. Should be about the same with Illusrator.

HTH,
Mark
 

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If you are submitting vector artwork (or even high resolution raster artwork), I don't think you'll have to worry about art charges.

Converting the text to curves or "outlines" makes it so the text is no longer a font, it's a "drawing". That way, if the printer doesn't have the same font on their computer that you used, it won't matter, because the text isn't a font anymore, it's part of the overall drawing (if that makes sense).
 

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And if you're feeling really nice, make sure to use pantone colors in your design. Make sure that you only use the amount of color in your design as will be printed. For example, if you are working on 4 color t-shirts, only have 4 pantone colors in the art. Sometimes as we design, we end up with a mix of pantone, cmyk, and rgb colors. Don't do that!

Your printer will love you for it. :)
 

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Sometimes as we design, we end up with a mix of pantone, cmyk, and rgb colors. Don't do that!
But if you can't help it or don't know how to not mix the colors, I wouldn't worry too much about it. You can still submit it to a printer and they will still love you :)

Ideally, it would be nice if all customers separated into just pantone colors and limited their artwork to certain types, but that's just not the case in reality. Customers have different experience levels and will give you all different types of files that need to be printed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks a lot for your helpful advice, guys. Appreciated.

Just one thing: so, it's always best to use pantone colours if the design is to be screenprinted?

I am using CMYK, but if I know that printers always want pantone, I'll change to this. I guess there's no point designing in colours that are not possible in real life.
 

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Ross B said:
I am using CMYK, but if I know that printers always want pantone, I'll change to this. I guess there's no point designing in colours that are not possible in real life.
Just about anything you design can be screen printed the problem is not
all screen printers have the know how to do it.
So what I would do is contact some shops and ask if they can print 4-color process,
simlated process, index. If they answer with no, or we only do spot color printing.
Then they are not shop you want. Have your artwork with you or ready to send
by email so the shop can see what you want done. They will at that time tell you if
you need to make any changes or not and what the limitations will be if any.

I hope this post was helpful.

M
 

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Just one thing: so, it's always best to use pantone colours if the design is to be screenprinted?
Pantone colors will help you match the colors in your design to your finished printed product.

Since it's a "standard" set of colors, if you pick Pantone 184 and the printer as Pantone 184 mixed, then there's a good chance your colors will match. Much better than if you picked "bright red" and the printer had to guess what shade of "bright red" to mix together to get your "bright red".
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
PrintMonkey said:
So what I would do is contact some shops and ask if they can print 4-color process, simlated process, index. If they answer with no, or we only do spot color printing. Then they are not shop you want.
I hope this post was helpful.
M
It was indeed helpful, PrintMonkey - thanks. Excuse my ignorance, but I have no idea of the differences between 4-colour process, simulated process, index and spot colour printing. If you could possibly give a brief summary of the basic differences between these, it would be great. I have a feeling there might be others who might benefit from your knowledge in this area, too.

Rodney,

Thanks for your further explanation - seems pretty clear that designing with the printer's colour type is eminently sensible.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Rodney, just to clarify your point above about Pantone colour, I have one vector design featuring red and black (to be printed on a 'natural' coloured Tshirt) and another of yellow, purple and white (to be printed on a black T):

No gradients or shades, just standard CMYK colours in each case. I can't work out how to change them to Pantone 184 - if, indeed, this is the most appropriate to use for these types of colours. My swatch library in Illustrator lists the following:

pantone metallic coated, pastel coated, pastel uncoated, process coated, process uncoated, solid coated, solid matte, solid to process Euro, solid to process, and Pantone solid uncoated.

I can't find Pantone 184. Would you mind indicating which of the options above would best ensure the colours in the designs are matched with those used by the printer? Apologies for my lack of knowledge here, but I'm trying to make the printer's life as easy as possible, as well as ensuring the designs come out as planned.

Cheers
 

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Ross B said:
It was indeed helpful, PrintMonkey - thanks. Excuse my ignorance, but I have no idea of the differences between 4-colour process, simulated process, index and spot colour printing. If you could possibly give a brief summary of the basic differences between these, it would be great. I have a feeling there might be others who might benefit from your knowledge in this area, too.
I don't think you'll want to use 4-color process on the designs you described. This process gives you any number of colors, but it is very expensive and requires high minimums; spot colors should do fine if you're only doing the 2 or 3 colors you're talking about.
 

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I can't find Pantone 184. Would you mind indicating which of the options above would best ensure the colours in the designs are matched with those used by the printer?
I would say that if you just tell your printer that you would like the red in the image to be pantone 184 and the black in the image to be pantone 013 (made up that one), then you should have no problem.

Your image could be blue and green, and if you just communicate with your printer that you want the blue to be red pantone 184 and the green to be black pantone 013, then you should be good to go. The art department should be able to make the appropriate changes for you.

I can't work out how to change them to Pantone 184 - if, indeed, this is the most appropriate to use for these types of colours. My swatch library in Illustrator lists the following
To answer your question though, I'm not sure how to change the colors in illustrator (I only have CorelDraw). But it might be similar to Richard's tutorial in CorelDraw? http://www.t-shirtforums.com/showthread.php?t=5986
 

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Ross B said:
Yep, that's what I thought, Twinge. But which of those Pantone options I listed above in my Illustrator swatch library do you think would be most appropriate?
I'm new to t-shirt printing techniques but did have some experience in paper prints. I use Illustrator and I always choose Pantone Solid Coated.
 
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