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i do 10 secs with parchment like splathead
(not a fan of teflon, leaves a grid pattern on everything, and/or a glossy finish, and monkeys with the heat and time)

light stretch after initial peel and after the repress
 

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if you find the jpss is way too hot for your hands to peel after initial press, don't wait 5 seconds and then peel
it is better to peel when it is just lukewarm, then don't stretch, just re-press with parchment for 12secs and then lightly stretch immediately horizontally and vertically

jpss is bullet-proof if done right, esp. on 50/50 blends (you can experiment with color tee's as well, i've found you need a good dark/black border, but the colors will shift slightly based on tee color - check here for some results)
heavy-heavy pressure is key, as well as time and temp

let customers know not to wash for 24 hours, and add a hang-tag to wash in cold and low dry
before you send them out to customers, give the design a feel and if it feels stiff/solid, give it a light stretch again
 

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Here is the best method for 100% cotton:
* It may work on 50/50 as well (not tested)

1. Use the smallest size press possible for the design (smaller area = higher pressure).
2. Use heat resistant gloves so you don't burn your hands in step 4 bellow.( $1 leather/canvas gloves will do).
3. Press the transfer to the shirt.
4. Once you open the press, grab the shirt immediately and stretch it from all sides as fast as possible.
The re is no need to peel the transfer as it will fall off on its own by the stretching.
Obviously you need to grab the shirt from the areas not covered by the transfer.
5. Re-press for 10 seconds and stretch again.
 

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4. Once you open the press, grab the shirt immediately and stretch it from all sides as fast as possible.
The re is no need to peel the transfer as it will fall off on its own by the stretching.
Obviously you need to grabbing the shirts from the areas not covered by the transfer.
I recall someone mentioning that technique long ago. Never got around to trying it myself, but if the end result is equally good, I see the merit. No worries about trying for perfect peeling angle and speed--or fumbling with getting the corner started. And it's a peel and stretch all in one. I'll have to remember to give that a try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is the best method for 100% cotton:
* It may work on 50/50 as well (not tested)

1. Use the smallest size press possible for the design (smaller area = higher pressure).
2. Use heat resistant gloves so you don't burn your hands in step 4 bellow.( $1 leather/canvas gloves will do).
3. Press the transfer to the shirt.
4. Once you open the press, grab the shirt immediately and stretch it from all sides as fast as possible.
The re is no need to peel the transfer as it will fall off on its own by the stretching.
Obviously you need to grabbing the shirts from the areas not covered by the transfer.
5. Re-press for 10 seconds and stretch again.
Thanks for the info.
 

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Being lazy, I use the same time for the repress as I did on the original. You can get different vinyl surface looks by picking a parchment with the surface you desire, e.g., gloss, semi gloss. or patterned. Repressing is definitely worth doing for both the look and better adhesion to the fabric.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Being lazy, I use the same time for the repress as I did on the original. You can get different vinyl surface looks by picking a parchment with the surface you desire, e.g., gloss, semi gloss. or patterned. Repressing is definitely worth doing for both the look and better adhesion to the fabric.
Thanks. Didn't even think of that, since I just bought a Geo Knight automatic release timer. Not sure if I can have two different times programmed in. Havent used yet.
 

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Thanks. Didn't even think of that, since I just bought a Geo Knight automatic release timer. Not sure if I can have two different times programmed in. Havent used yet.
My flatbed press is an auto release also, so it is simpler to repress with the same settings. I have never harmed a garment or hat doing a repress. My hat press is not auto release, but I still use the same settings for the repress.
 

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Being lazy, I use the same time for the repress as I did on the original. You can get different vinyl surface looks by picking a parchment with the surface you desire, e.g., gloss, semi gloss. or patterned. Repressing is definitely worth doing for both the look and better adhesion to the fabric.
are you still talking about jpss, because it is more of a glue than a vinyl like 3g?

i did not know parchment paper came in different surfaces, do you mean teflon?

i'm surprised there is not any damage to the fibers or smoke/fire after a minute of 375f pressing
assuming you do a hot peel, then re-press right away
 

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are you still talking about jpss, because it is more of a glue than a vinyl like 3g?

i did not know parchment paper came in different surfaces, do you mean teflon?

i'm surprised there is not any damage to the fibers or smoke/fire after a minute of 375f pressing
assuming you do a hot peel, then re-press right away
I'm talking about vinyl only. 300 to 310 degrees at 10 to 12 seconds. I have found parchments with different surfaces in the cooking section of stores. I only mentioned parchment as it was brought up. I almost exclusively use Teflon, and have a collection of old Teflon sheets with varying surfaces. The new Teflon sheets are usually just smooth, but after lots of use vary a lot.
 

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I'm talking about vinyl only. 300 to 310 degrees at 10 to 12 seconds. I have found parchments with different surfaces in the cooking section of stores. I only mentioned parchment as it was brought up. I almost exclusively use Teflon, and have a collection of old Teflon sheets with varying surfaces. The new Teflon sheets are usually just smooth, but after lots of use vary a lot.
ok, but this thread is about jpss and your advice could be quite unsafe with it
 
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