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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, here's the deal: I get calls all the time from local bands wanting t-shirts printed...but they all want friggin' BLACK! (Jeez...expand your minds a bit and go outside the norm!) Anyway, I hate to turn away business, so I've been researching Coastal's 2-Step Opague Material and TransferWear Dark. Anybody got an opinion on either of these?

I use an OKI C8800 laser printer, if that makes any difference. And how do you get the color WHITE?

Any and all opinions are welcome. Thanks in advance...

Drew
 

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Interesting product. So if I understand correctly, instead of printing on thin vinyl and pressing that to the shirt, you print on transfer paper for lights, press that on a piece of thin white cloth and then press that onto a dark shirt? Have you tested this process yet? What keeps the fabric from fraying when you trim around it? Can it be trimmed on a cutter?

I've never seen band shirts done with transfer paper. Considering they usually sell for $20-25 each, I would be ticked off if I bought one and found out it was a transfer. Why not use plastisol transfers or have them screenprinted?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Interesting product. So if I understand correctly, instead of printing on thin vinyl and pressing that to the shirt, you print on transfer paper for lights, press that on a piece of thin white cloth and then press that onto a dark shirt? Have you tested this process yet? What keeps the fabric from fraying when you trim around it? Can it be trimmed on a cutter?

I've never seen band shirts done with transfer paper. Considering they usually sell for $20-25 each, I would be ticked off if I bought one and found out it was a transfer. Why not use plastisol transfers or have them screenprinted?
I'm talking about "local" bands; those with a very limited budget. That alone makes screen printing almost out of the question. First, because of the setup charges involved, and second, most of these bands want small runs - maybe 15 or 20 shirts at a pop. That too makes screen printing less of an option, because to get a decent deal per shirt, they have to order a ton. Of course they could go to somebody who has a makeshift screening setup in their garage...but the end product is usually crap. And I guarantee these aren't going to sell for $20+ - more like $12 or $15. Thus my reason for trying to come up with a way to press them. Make sense?
 

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Look at freedom transfers - full color plastisol at reasonable prices for that quantity. I can't remember the cost but I think it's around 3-4 per transfer. They have a different feel to them but I think that would be the way to go if it's more than one or two colors. If it's just one or two colors look at ace or first edition for plastisol.

Chad
 

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The TransferWear line of products work great with Oki printers. Thus I would recommend the TransferWear Dark. You can find it at tshirtsupplies.com, I know that if you decide to go with that product.
 

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Make sense?
Not really. Many "local" bands make as much or more from shirt sales as from playing music. But it is what it is, and its a customer wanting 20 shirts on the cheap so you do what you gotta do.

To get white you don't print any color, the substrate is white.
 

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Drew...there are many companies that sell the 2 step opaque and a similar paper to the t'wear dark. the 2 step paper is basically a white backing that is pressed on to the garment and then you apply the actual transfer to it. the problem is that it is quite heavy and gives a very heavy 'hand' to the print. the opaque inkjet paper is a white film that you are printing on without reversing the image. you then peel the film away from the backing, apply it to the garment, cover it with a sheet of silicone paper and press on to the garment. remember, you are applying a white rectangle and unless you trim around the image the entire rectangle will appear. it's not perfect but it is an economical way to offer small quantities of custom prints on dark garments.
 

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Transferwear Dark is a great product, which is real easy to use and relatively low cost, BUT a 2-step process where you are pressing onto a material which is pressing on the shirt, is far more durable. You cannot compare the durability with that of Transferwear Dark (or any other single step process).

If you want durability and your customer is prepared to pay a premium for this, then use the 2-step.
If not, then use the 1-step process (transferwear dark).
 
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