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I have not even used this ink yet, and I'm very new to screen printing. However, before I get started, I figured I should cover all my based. How should I go about cleaning my Permaset Aqua Super Cover White in my apartment? I want to make sure I'm being smart and safe while cleaning up.

Any other helpful tips and tricks for using this Permaset ink would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers!
 

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Water alone will not be enough. I use EnviroSolv made by CCI, but any equivalent product would do the job.

At first I did this in my bath/shower.

Is your shower head on a hose rather than just a fixed peace of plumbing that sticks out of the wall? Possible either way, but easier if it is movable as when on a hose.

You want a good sized cellulose sponge, like 4" x 8".

First spray down your shower/tub so it is less likely to stain. Then spray out the screen. Once the water spray has removed all the ink it is going to, dampen your sponge and spray a little EnviroSolv (or the like) on the screen and rub it around (you'll probably need to find your own spray bottle to put the cleaner in). Do this from both sides. Then spray that out with water.

EnviroSolv is probably not 100% a good thing to breathe, but no cleaner will be. At least the bathroom will have a fan.

The biggest thing to remember with using the ink in general is that it losing water to the air and to the screen when in use. You should keep your virgin unused ink in the original container and have another for your working ink, the ink that has been in a screen and will be used again. That way you'll always have some fresh ink to look at as a reference of how wet the ink should be. Generally, with white supercover, if you get a big blob of ink on a metal cake knife or spatula or whatever, most of it should fairly easily slide off. Do that with the virgin ink to learn how it acts, then add a bit of distilled water to your working ink when it no longer acts right. A spray bottle is handy for this, as can also be used to add a bit of moisture when on press.

Over time some ink residue will buildup on the emulsion. Shouldn't present an actual problem if using a cleaner, but with water alone that buildup would get out of hand. Obviously there shouldn't be any ink residue in the open mesh of the image area.
 

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Water alone will not be enough. I use EnviroSolv made by CCI, but any equivalent product would do the job.

At first I did this in my bath/shower.

Is your shower head on a hose rather than just a fixed peace of plumbing that sticks out of the wall? Possible either way, but easier if it is movable as when on a hose.

You want a good sized cellulose sponge, like 4" x 8".

First spray down your shower/tub so it is less likely to stain. Then spray out the screen. Once the water spray has removed all the ink it is going to, dampen your sponge and spray a little EnviroSolv (or the like) on the screen and rub it around (you'll probably need to find your own spray bottle to put the cleaner in). Do this from both sides. Then spray that out with water.

EnviroSolv is probably not 100% a good thing to breathe, but no cleaner will be. At least the bathroom will have a fan.

The biggest thing to remember with using the ink in general is that it losing water to the air and to the screen when in use. You should keep your virgin unused ink in the original container and have another for your working ink, the ink that has been in a screen and will be used again. That way you'll always have some fresh ink to look at as a reference of how wet the ink should be. Generally, with white supercover, if you get a big blob of ink on a metal cake knife or spatula or whatever, most of it should fairly easily slide off. Do that with the virgin ink to learn how it acts, then add a bit of distilled water to your working ink when it no longer acts right. A spray bottle is handy for this, as can also be used to add a bit of moisture when on press.

Over time some ink residue will buildup on the emulsion. Shouldn't present an actual problem if using a cleaner, but with water alone that buildup would get out of hand. Obviously there shouldn't be any ink residue in the open mesh of the image area.
Damn, that's detailed! Thanks for the pro tips!
 
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