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Discussion Starter #1
What's the cheapest possible Pantone colour guide?

That's all I want to say.... :)
 

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Why are pantone guides so damn expensive anyway? Is it just price gouging because they have a monopoly and know certain printers and designers have to buy their product? Or something to do with the difficulty of the fact that their printing needs to be absolutely perfect?

I've often wondered if the cost is considered reasonable amongst those who would be in more of a position to know, or not.
 

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I think you nailed it...
They are the standard for the print and design industry, and their colors have to be 100% consistant. I can't imagine that they sell large numbers of pantone books either... they serve a very particular market and many designers do not buy new pantone books every year.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Elevate(r) said:
I think you nailed it...
They are the standard for the print and design industry, and their colors have to be 100% consistant. I can't imagine that they sell large numbers of pantone books either... they serve a very particular market and many designers do not buy new pantone books every year.
To be honest, I suspect they have a *huge* market.

Every single manufacturer in the world needs the guides. Every printer, and packaging maker, and fashion house, every material producer.

Here's an interesting fact for you. Did you know that every single major colour trend in fashion is dictated by Pantone? Three or four years before a "new colour" or "colour range" (such as pastels, or deeps, or whites) becomes the next big thing, Pantone releases a new colour chart to the major dyehouses. They, in effect, tell the dyehouses what new colours to blend. Then the fashion cutters buy from this identical world-wide new range from the dye houses. These then become the fashion houses theme colours for that season.

Happens every year. If "muted purple" is the next big thing, it's because those specific new shades made-mainstream were decided 4 years ago by Pantone.
 

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two cents

It isn't just that dictating color/paint/swatches.

Automobile makers have major pull in this area, more so than the fashion industry. New colors/paints are outsourced, the exclusive rights are bought and negotiated. The first people to get a new color/paint are, generally, always the automakers.

It is a mjor area of study for auto makers. Think of how many times you have said "That would be a totally awesome car --if it wasn't that color." Imagine watching an automaker cringe because they just heard you didn't given them $23,000 because of a color. It happens all the time (minus the automaker listening in on your conversation.)

The difference between 'a paint' and 'a color' is that 'sparkly dark green' is 'sparkly dark green' is unfortunatley not in the ROYGBIV color spectrum. You can't patent a color, you can patent a paint. $Bling$

Oddly enough, fine art paint companies are way behind when it comes to putting out new colors. Woe is my canvas.

dylan
 
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