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How do you handle customers who don't value your time? It seems everyone expects a tshirt to cost the $5, whether its one color or 6 and only 1 or 100. I've tried to educate them but it seems like there is always someone that is willing to do it dirt cheap.
 

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How do you handle customers who don't value your time? It seems everyone expects a tshirt to cost the $5, whether its one color or 6 and only 1 or 100. I've tried to educate them but it seems like there is always someone that is willing to do it dirt cheap.
1. Do not talk much.
2. Point out that screen-printed shirts are superior.
3. Offer DTG, sublimation or transfers as cheap lower quality alternatives.
 

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How do you handle customers who don't value your time? It seems everyone expects a tshirt to cost the $5, whether its one color or 6 and only 1 or 100. I've tried to educate them but it seems like there is always someone that is willing to do it dirt cheap.
Let them go. We run into that all the time. We don't bottom feed. We don't compete on price.

We compete on value only.

Here is what you will find with your competition...

Sub standard shirts or seconds. They quote a 6.1oz but deliver less or just count on the customer not knowing the difference.

They cheat on materials. The worst we saw was a red shirt with a white print and the print turned pink before delivery but they took them anyway.

Spelling errors. We see it all the time.

Sub standard prints. You get what you pay for.

Make your value proposition. You have to sell it. You won't win every order but you will win some of them. Remember, every group has someone who has a friend that can do it cheaper. All you can do is to stand your ground.

In the end when they bring the bad print to you and ask you to fix it you can now command a good price for your work.

Stay the course.
 

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We all had to suck it up until we built up enough trade to tell them to get lost. When the orders started stacking up we could get choosey.

Most of the bargain hunters will move on to the next new start-up that comes along, offering the cheapest price.


Part of the problem is that everyone under the age of 40 grew up with low volume digital printing. They don't understand quantity discounts or set up costs. Ebay has shown them how to shop around for the cheapest.
 

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What would you rather do - sell THOUSANDS at a meagre markup, or sell HUNDREDS with a decent markup and still achieve the same profit?
Yes, I like this example. We were selling soda for a group, 50 cents a can. Cost was 25 cents a can. It was a captive audience with no place else to go. My proposal was to sell them at $1 a can. At that price we only need to sell 1/3 the amount for the same profit and have less risk.

I take profitable orders, I let my competition take the unprofitable ones. ;)
 

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Sometimes I have to bite my tongue (or keyboard fingers) not to go off on some of these inconsiderate a-wholes. I can appreciate shopping for a bargain, but often they don't care about a fair deal and just want to push BEYOND the limits.

I had one yesterday. Infuriating.
 

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We just had one come back to bite a customer in the @$$. We had been doing shirts, hats, hoodies for a local group. They wanted to supply another type of garment and just have a simple print on them. We told them $6 each and they went with someone who would do it for $4. Now they are coming to us for one-offs for the same thing. We referred them back to the original vendor for that item.
 
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