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Hi all, just completed my first job! Things were shaky in the beginning but it turned out ok. Thanx to all who helped me out! Anyways, the client ordered white ink on black tees, now they are asking for black ink on white tees. The white tees cost less than the black so should I reduce the price a bit or leave the cost the same?? Please advise, Thx!!
 

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I charge less for white tees because they cost me less to buy.
it does make sense that you could also charge less because there is less work involved in printing white shirts.
I have a basic pricing scale that I start my orders with. I do a 5,6,7 scale for lightweights and a 6,7,8 scale for heavyweights. This is for whites/heathers/colors. Eventually I'm going to get away from this as I get more jobs and can start generating more data about my jobs/profits/etc.

I've cut jobs way down to do white shirts because of how quickly I can do them. A white shirt with Black ink is the best job for me because I can print the shirt and have it cured in about a minute. That's where I can be the most productive and get jobs out the door quickly.
 

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If we are talking huge orders the by all means lower your price. If we are talking small orders (under 100) then leave price with all other printed shirts.
if you get a great deal on 100 black shirts are you going to lower your black shirt prices then raise them after you sold all the deal shirts. Can you go into JC Penneys and get a lower price because of the shirt color?
Having to many different prices is going to cause you more work keeping up with figuring what you paid. Keep it simple
if you feel your ripping people of because your dead set on making only a certian percent then figure out how many white shirts you sell compared to darks then lower all your shirts to equal out
 

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FearlessFX makes some good points, but I think you have to look at your target markets. If you are selling retail or your own product line, I agree on the same price regardless of color, if you can do that.

When printing for others, it is pretty standard across the industry to have 1 price for colored shirts, and a different price for whites (and sometimes heather grey). About $1 less sounds about right. Most customers that regularly order screen printing will expect a different price. You can also use it as a sales tool. If a customer has a design for a blue shirt with a white print, and they are balking because of their budget, you can sell them the solution of white shirt with blue print to save some $$$.

Good luck!
Nick
 

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Thanx! You all are great! Humor me for a second. What would you charge for 28 white shirts/black ink, full chest and back prints? I'm only on an extension of my first job and want to at least be in the ball park.
 

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Thanx! You all are great! Humor me for a second. What would you charge for 28 white shirts/black ink, full chest and back prints? I'm only on an extension of my first job and want to at least be in the ball park.
it depends on the style/weight of shirt. Also are we factoring in screen costs again?
With screen costs It would be:
$214 for lightweights(5.5oz area) - avg of $7.65 per shirt
$242 for heavyweights(6.1oz area) - avg of $8.65

Without screens it would be:
$154 for lightweights - avg of $5.5 per shrit
$182 for heavyweights - avg of $6.5 per shirt

prices would be $1-2 more for 2XL-4XL depending on what manufacturer I got them from.
 

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Ok, I wasn't too far off. I charged 9.50, and a bit more for the 2-4x. Thanx!
Don't over concern your self how acurate your prices are. You should price your product to what you need to get out of them not what others are charging. What I mean is if you asked $10.50 and the customer agrees then that was the right price. Other shops charge different because of their size or lack of, abilities and other work loads. What ever you do don't under cut yourself to get the order. Thats gonna cost you a lot more then profit.
A local shop in my neighborhood under cut some of my shirts by like $12. I had my orders farmed out to him and he made his $4 a shirt but I stilled sold them for regular price to my customers. Unfortunaly he shut down after 6 months. I would rather do 2 $20 shirts any day over 4 $10 shirts. Half the work same profit
 

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I can just tell you how I do it.

I charge less for a white shirt because it costs me less.

I mark up the shirt a percentage (usually 100% depending on the garment) so if the shirt costs me less to buy then it is less for the customer. If I'm printing black ink I charge less because it's just one hit of ink.....I print and then cure shirt's done, there's no flash like with white. I charge $.50 more for white ink, it takes twice as much ink and takes twice as long to print.
 

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What you need to do is figure how much profit you want to make on supplying the shirt, regardless of your cost. With me, if I pay $1.00 for the shirt, I charge $1.50. If I pay $2.00, I charge $3. I have to make something on the shirt since I have to buy it and usually pick it up at the warehouse. What I charge to print the shirt is a separate issue altogether, and it's based on the number of colors/screens in the job.
 

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This is interesting. In my area of the world all the screen printers are all real close in price. My theory is that if McDonalds and Burger King are selling burgers, basically the same burger, why would a customer pay the higher price for the same burger. If I can't make a profit at the going rate of what my competitors are selling for than I must offer something different or better than they are. If I can't offer anything different than everyone else and can't make a profit at the competitive price than I'm history.
 

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I understand what you are saying Mike, but back to the OP's question, do you sell white for the same price as colored or dark shirts, the answer is no. Using your burger analogy, a hamburger is $1 a cheeseburger is $1.25... I'm going to charge more for the cheeseburger. It has a different value.

This is interesting. In my area of the world all the screen printers are all real close in price. My theory is that if McDonalds and Burger King are selling burgers, basically the same burger, why would a customer pay the higher price for the same burger. If I can't make a profit at the going rate of what my competitors are selling for than I must offer something different or better than they are. If I can't offer anything different than everyone else and can't make a profit at the competitive price than I'm history.
 

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I understand what you are saying Mike, but back to the OP's question, do you sell white for the same price as colored or dark shirts, the answer is no. Using your burger analogy, a hamburger is $1 a cheeseburger is $1.25... I'm going to charge more for the cheeseburger. It has a different value.
I agree, I do the same. But if all my competitors did not and I was losing business because I could not compete, I would have to adjust.
 
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