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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently using DXP and exposing with the halogen light stand sent with my semi pro kit. Was wondering if the Ulano QX-1 would be ulano equivilant or something else.
From what I've read it looks like the ulano has a longer shelf life than DXP?
Thoughts? Need to order some emulsion soon and ain't real happy with the results I've been having with the DXP.

Thanks!
Craig
 

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I tried the QX1 and liked the dxp better because it seems to more user friendly. The QX exposes alot faster. If you do your coating, exposing and washing out in the same light safe room it may be ok but I run the screen printing part of my business from the house so I coat in 1 room, expose in another room and wash out in another so for me it didnt work out very well.

Hope this helps
 

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I am using a 8 bulb black light with compression lid and with the QX I my exposure time on a 110 screen went from 3min 25 sec to 1min That is with 2 coats of emulsion on the print side.
 

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Yea thats what I had to do, I tried my normal exposure time my first screen and it was overexposed so I did a step test. One tip that helped me was after you burn the screen soak both sides real good for a couple minutes then wash it out with a hose, then bake it in the sun for a while or put it back n your light box. Whenever I used my pressure washer and didnt soak it very long I wasen't very happy with my screens. It was just too much thinking so I just switched back to the DXP (what I was use to)
 

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I have been using DXP and I love it but I dont burn a lot of screens so I worry about the shelf life. Thats why I am trying QX-1. Although I am about out of DXP and I have had it for around 8 months and it is still working.
 

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I'm currently using DXP and exposing with the halogen light stand sent with my semi pro kit.

Was wondering if the Ulano QX-1 would be ulano equivilant or something else.

From what I've read it looks like the ulano has a longer shelf life than DXP?
DXP is a diazo sensitized dual cure emulsion. As with all diazo sensitized emulsion, once the diazo is mixed with water, it begins to decay. Like milk or lettuce, diazo sensitized emulsions don't perform well after 4-6 weeks. 60°F-75°F storage can improve pot life.

QX-1 is pre-sensitized at the Ulano factory, but has the same performance as any other dual-cure, it just doesn't use diazo as one of the sensitizers. Shelf life is 18 months at room temperature. You never need to sensitize or stir it. QX-1 costs about US$12 more than DXP per gallon.
 

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I have had a quart of cci dxp for about 8 months and it is still working good when burning screens. I have noticed that it is breaking down a little on the screen after i have cleaned ink off of the screen and then use it to print next time.
I just got some QX-1 and I am going to try it.
Not going against your word. I think it has a lot to do with the environment.
I am using water based ink.
 

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I have had a quart of cci dxp for about 8 months and it is still working good when burning screens.

I have noticed that it is breaking down a little on the screen after i have cleaned ink off of the screen and then use it to print next time.

I just got some QX-1 and I am going to try it.

Not going against your word. I think it has a lot to do with the environment.

I am using water based ink.
Storage life is all about the environment. I am glad you are still able to use your diazo dual cure after 8 months, but you wrote that your stencil is breaking down. It has been common for me to get 75,000 to 100,000 impressions from fresh diazo dual cure and I reclaim the mesh because the stencil is cracking after so many flexing print strokes.

Diazo dual cure will expose differently (usually faster), as it ages, but there just isn't as much usable diazo left as it ages to completely cross link the stencil and hold it in the mesh - so it will probably break down as you print or not be as durable. It's like playing football with only 7 players instead of 11. It still works.

QX-1 is not designed for water resistance so I don't recommend you use it for water based ink. Almost any diazo sensitized emulsion will last longer than QX-1. You may have short runs, and the stencil may survive, and since you don't use a quart of emulsion in 8 months, you can take advantage of the longer shelf life of the pre-sensitized emulsion. QX-1 will cost 15-20% more than DXP.
 
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I am just using it for very short runs. I print around 10 shirts and then clean the screen cause i dont want the ink to dry in the screen.
I am not doing it as a business. I coach a soccer team and I am printing tshirts for them.
I am a bit scared to try to use plastisol yet. I had printed around 30 shirts (10 at a time) and noticed that the screen was starting to break down so I burned and new screen. Any tip you can give will be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think I will have to try some QX-1. I still have a couple of questions about it.

1. Will the screen last as long as DXP before needing reclaimed using plastisol inks?

2. Can they still be reclaimed with the same reclaimers?

Thanks!
Craig
 

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I should have been more specific. I have always used WB inks and would like to try plastisol but i have to buy my chemicals online and it gets expensive. To clean plastisol ink from screens.
 

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I think I will have to try some QX-1. I still have a couple of questions about it.

1. Will the screen last as long as DXP before needing reclaimed using plastisol inks?

2. Can they still be reclaimed with the same reclaimers?
For completely exposed stencils I have regularly printed tens of thousands of impressions. I would be disappointed with any stencil I made with direct emulsion that didn't last 50,000 impressions. It also helps that since I met Don Newman in 1982, I always use screens with 20-25 newtons which minimizes stencil stretching because I can lower off-contact.

Plastisol is the most harmless ink system I know. Plastisol doesn't break down stencils. Using dragon breath solvents to clean up mild little plastisol, is playing with fire that will damage you stencil, especially if it is under exposed.

Water can break down under exposed stencils, because it is a basic component of the emulsion itself and if you don't expose it with invisible UV energy, it won't resist the natural desire of water to dissolve your stencil and rinse it down the drain.

For completely exposed stencils, reclaiming is a simple process because stencil remover attacks the cross links that hold the stencil in the mesh, which solvents and water don't. If you cut all the cross links, the stencil dissolves and runs off the mesh.

As regular readers of my posts and seminars will know, I want everyone, in every screen room, to use a Stouffer 21 Step Gray Scale to monitor stencil hardness on every screen the ever expose. The numbered steps, of the known densities, give you visual feedback of exactly how well you hardened your stencil. The more you focus on completely exposing your stencil, the fewer problems you will have. The same goes for tension. The more you raise the mesh tension to 30 newtons, the fewer problem you have printing.

US$6 to US$12 for a Stouffer 21 Step depending where you buy it. How much is your time worth?
 
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I have always used WB inks and would like to try plastisol but i have to buy my chemicals online and it gets expensive. To clean plastisol ink from screens.

  1. Scrape all unused ink back into the bucket.
  2. Use a dry rag to wipe up as much ink as possible.
  3. Make 4 squirts (5 cents?), with a spray bottle (like cleaning a window), of hardware store mineral spirits and wipe up the minimal amount of ink left.
  4. It will be hard to tell what color ink you had in the screen.
This is not a place to focus your energy. Sell shirts.
 

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I have heard that you cant iron plastisol ink. All I have now is a heat gun to cure.
Plastisol ink will stick to the hot heat platen. You have to use some sort of barrier like a Teflon sheet or parchment - available from your screen printing supplier.

The first shirts I ever printed, I cured with a heat press (which I learned to do by reading Scott Fresener's How to Print T-Shirts For Fun and Profit - 1979).


The heat gun blasts a circle of air, and it is hard to make sure you covered the entire print. The heat seal press usually cures the entire shirt in less than 10 second depending on the ink and shirt.
 
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