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I originally printed from Illustrator. Artwork is CMYK with C=0,M=0,Y=0,K=100.

I believe I have all the print options cranked to max quality however if I look super closely at my film positive, curves are not smooth. From a normal viewing distance my film print looks awesome but the effect seems to be magnified by the time I expose a screen and then use ink. I output a 1600dpi PNG from Illustrator and printed from Photoshop. That actually improved the edges however I can still detect some saw tooth effect. I've exposed enough screens to know it's still too jagged for a nice print with ink. I'd take a photo with my phone however It won't be high res enough to make out what I'm referring to.

Anyone using this printer able to help me out? Thanks!
Vectorized image will give you a crisp Line always. As you are Screen Printing, when you output your films if you have 100% of each CMYK or just only 100% of the black which is enough depending upon which printer you’re using to print, there should be no bitmap on the edges or on the lines. By you converting this for some reason into a PNG or JPEG more in Photoshop, and if you try to enlarge it depending on the resolution that you created it on Photoshop or saved it in Photoshop will result into a bitmap image so that’s when you see the jagged edges. I suggest to print directly from illustrator if possible or PDF from illustrator if possible maintaining vectorized images so you can increase it to thousand percent and it will be perfect it will never be jagged. That will solve the problem no and if or but
 

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You guys both know what you're talking about thanks for the input! I'm hoping my next round of exposures will be good enough. The SVG in Inkscape combo ended up being about the same as from Illustrator directly for me. The 1800 dpi png from Illustrator (with fine art anti-aliasing) printed from Photoshop is the best I've been able to get today. That combined with having the ink side of the film against the screen (God I hope that is important enough to make a big difference!) might just be enough. Guess I should have gotten the Epson 1430. If this doesn't pan out... I still might.
You will always want the ink side of the film against the screen during exposure to avoid undercutting. I think your issue here is your printer, though I've not used Canon printers for films, only Epson. We've been outputting our films from Illustrator for the last 20 years or so, and we use AccuRIP. We've had 3 Epson 1400's, which aren't available anymore, then a couple of larger printers, and currently the T3270 for the last 4 years. If you don't want to pay for a RIP, then you could put each color of a job on a separate page fill it with black, then print it out separately. Good luck...
 

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You will always want the ink side of the film against the screen during exposure to avoid undercutting. I think your issue here is your printer, though I've not used Canon printers for films, only Epson. We've been outputting our films from Illustrator for the last 20 years or so, and we use AccuRIP. We've had 3 Epson 1400's, which aren't available anymore, then a couple of larger printers, and currently the T3270 for the last 4 years. If you don't want to pay for a RIP, then you could put each color of a job on a separate page fill it with black, then print it out separately. Good luck...
Yes the issue is the printer I believe. I'm well aware of the limitations of scaling raster images... I printed from Illustrator at the start of this journey. The lack of postscript on this Canon is apparently the culprit. My films are great I am now in the process of trying a Diazo emulsion to see how the final stencil compares to the washout I get with the stuff I was using. I'm hoping it looks better and I don't need to replace my 230 screens with 305. I am happy with the final output on a 305 if it comes to that though. I have made sure to expose ink side to screen going forward as per a previous suggestion thank-you.
 

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I originally printed from Illustrator. Artwork is CMYK with C=0,M=0,Y=0,K=100.

I believe I have all the print options cranked to max quality however if I look super closely at my film positive, curves are not smooth. From a normal viewing distance my film print looks awesome but the effect seems to be magnified by the time I expose a screen and then use ink. I output a 1600dpi PNG from Illustrator and printed from Photoshop. That actually improved the edges however I can still detect some saw tooth effect. I've exposed enough screens to know it's still too jagged for a nice print with ink. I'd take a photo with my phone however It won't be high res enough to make out what I'm referring to.

Anyone using this printer able to help me out? Thanks!
Hey doodlebrains, I have a colleague who prints straight from Illustrator to a non post script printer, he doesnt want to fork out the cash they want for the film rip programs. Anyway, he gets around the postscrip issue by making sure his finished vector art is all 100% Black then converts it to a bitmap before sending it to the printer for film. He may actually create a mask or remove the background as well, as he still lays multiple images on his work sheet. He uses exactly the same printer as me and the result is as good as my rip program which is FilmMaker. It does not matter whether you are in CMYK or RGB as long as all your images are the same colour format other wise the printer will interpret the difference as shading. If you cant get this to work, let me know and I'll find out exactly what he does.
 

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Hey doodlebrains, I have a colleague who prints straight from Illustrator to a non post script printer, he doesnt want to fork out the cash they want for the film rip programs. Anyway, he gets around the postscrip issue by making sure his finished vector art is all 100% Black then converts it to a bitmap before sending it to the printer for film. He may actually create a mask or remove the background as well, as he still lays multiple images on his work sheet. He uses exactly the same printer as me and the result is as good as my rip program which is FilmMaker. It does not matter whether you are in CMYK or RGB as long as all your images are the same colour format other wise the printer will interpret the difference as shading. If you cant get this to work, let me know and I'll find out exactly what he does.
Sorry I should have read the whole chat :geek::censored:
 

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It does not matter whether you are in CMYK or RGB as long as all your images are the same colour format other wise the printer will interpret the difference as shading.
It's just good practice, because non-postscript printer drivers will convert it to RGB anyway.
I don't think it makes any difference for the issue in question, but it is better to avoid any unnecessary conversion by the printer driver.

Canon itself recommends using RGB even for postscript printers (except in very specific cases).
Although printers work with CMYK and your images are in RGB, you should not perform a CMYK conversion yourself in your image editing software prior to printing your images except in very specific cases, such as when you are producing a hard proof to send to a client for colour matching. The printer driver software will do the appropriate conversion from RGB to CMYK to ensure the best results.
 
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