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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings and thanks in advance to anyone who is willing to help! I recently had a bad experience with burning an image on a screen. There are a series of variables that I need to find out but I'm starting with the variable that I know was different for this time.

So I ran out the transparencies that I got from Micheal's that are meant for screen printing. Found out that my job had a bunch of old transparencies. So I used the regular transparency my last time burning my image. I did the same process I've previously had success with but the image was faintly visable and all the emulsion washed out.

My overall question is was it the transparency that I used?
 

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When all of the emulsion washes out either you tried burning the image before the emulsion dried completely or you did not expose it long enough. Emulsion is very watersoluable until it is exposed. Once exposed, it becomes less water soluable. Any transperancy should work, some are just better for ink jet printing (darker ink = more fine detail)
 

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When all of the emulsion washes out either you tried burning the image before the emulsion dried completely or you did not expose it long enough. Emulsion is very watersoluable until it is exposed. Once exposed, it becomes less water soluable. Any transperancy should work, some are just better for ink jet printing (darker ink = more fine detail)
 

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How was the quality of the transparency film compared to your usual ones? I used those old-school transparencies for years, they work pretty good most of the time. If the print on the film isn't dark enough, you can lightly spray a Matte Clear or Toner Aid to improve the opacity of the film. I also had excellent results using those same transparencies but outputting them from a color copier. Color copiers lay down a much richer, opaque black than the standard black+white ones do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you Industry! Thats about what I was thinking. I have actually experienced the senario where the screen didn't dry properly and everything washed out. Even then I was able to see the image appear as the edges began to wash out (I was sick!). I doubled up the image because my printer is only a HP LaserJet P1102w blk/white and not industrial. Under exposing was a consideration but I exposed for the same amount of time I always do.....between 18-20 minutes. But reading posts I'm seeing that is a lot longer than recommended.

FYI I'm using a jerry-rigged exposing setup where I lay the screen on a glass table (about 24 inches high) with a flood light on the ground. Covering up the sides with a towel or sheet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks whitlock. I have actually experienced the senario where the screen didn't dry properly and everything washed out. Even then I was able to see the image appear as the edges began to wash out (I was sick!). I doubled up the image because my printer is only a HP LaserJet P1102w blk/white and not industrial. Under exposing was a consideration but I exposed for the same amount of time I always do.....between 18-20 minutes. But reading posts I'm seeing that is a lot longer than recommended.

FYI I'm using a jerry-rigged exposing setup where I lay the screen on a glass table (about 24 inches high) with a flood light on the ground. Covering up the sides with a towel or sheet.
 

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I exposed screens the same way when I started out. It helps a lot if you can put a small board or piece of cardboard that fits inside the screen and put a little bit of weight (Like a full ink container) on it. The weight and board will push your film against your screen making it burn a bit crisper and with more detail while blocking out the excess light.
 

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Yes. The weight will help a lot. And always clean the surface of the glass. My unit has a vacuum suction lid, I love it. To help cure/dry the emulsion quicker, place a small space heater in the cabinet you dry your coated screens, or make walls out a cardboard box to keep the heat around the screens on a rack.
 

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If you are exposing for longer time make sure your image doesn’t have any light coming through the black ink. Put the image up to a light to double check it. I’ve had to use a sharpie on a couple of images before to ensure none of the emulsion under the black ink exposes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks again! That gives me some piece of mind about my journey. Although my wife would like her table back lol. I will be sure to add some weight.

Also, I have been winging it on the exposure time. I haven't explored the testing proccess yet. What is a general time for the specs of my table setup using speedball diazo? And does the sides have to be covered to keep light inside?
 
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