T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

My vision for my line is to be higher end designer t-shirts like Lauren Moshi.
(ie: www.laurenmoshi.com)

My designs are unique and will only be sold in limited editions quantities. Signed and numbered.

I am producing the designs on high quality t shirts.

My question is, being that I am just starting out is it a good idea to price my shirts in the range of the site I listed above? ($75-$120)

If I price the shirts at a lower price would it be wrong to then raise the price once I start getting recognition? And if so wouldn't my customers frown upon that? Did a designer like Lauren Moshi start out pricing her shirts at $75-$120?

Thanks:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Hello,

My vision for my line is to be higher end designer t-shirts like Lauren Moshi.
(ie: www.laurenmoshi.com)

My designs are unique and will only be sold in limited editions quantities. Signed and numbered.

I am producing the designs on high quality t shirts.

My question is, being that I am just starting out is it a good idea to price my shirts in the range of the site I listed above? ($75-$120)

If I price the shirts at a lower price would it be wrong to then raise the price once I start getting recognition? And if so wouldn't my customers frown upon that? Did a designer like Lauren Moshi start out pricing her shirts at $75-$120?

Thanks:eek:
I've always said, "YOU GET WHAT YOU PLAY FOR"

A large population of customers (especially women who have "income to spend" will actually be happier to pay $100 for a T-Shirt or Babydoll, as they would paying $9.99 or $20.

Though, it might be easier to sell 100 shirts at $20 vs 20 shirts at $100...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
Will you be able to get your designs in front of celebrities like the shop you posted? If so then yes, if not then I think you will have a steep hill to climb. You will have some serious marketing to do to get the average Jane to pay $100 for a tank top/t-shirt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,680 Posts
My question is, being that I am just starting out is it a good idea to price my shirts in the range of the site I listed above? ($75-$120)
The justification of that price range is in the branding, marketing, perceived value and distribution. Limited edition and high quality are great, but that means nothing unless a mass of people know about it. So the question is, what are you going to do to make people want to spend $75-120 on your shirts? Without a huge marketing budget, I don't think you can start out in that price range. I think you need to start modestly and grow from there.

If I price the shirts at a lower price would it be wrong to then raise the price once I start getting recognition?
No, it wouldn't be wrong at all. That's the value of getting recognition. But keep in mind, something needs to happen for you to start selling in that price range. For most brands, it's getting picked up by retailers. Maybe it's smaller boutiques, maybe it's bigger chains or department stores. But that's usually a milestone when you start seeing a brand's prices go up. And in most cases, it's not the brand setting the price, it's the retailer. Once retailers establish a price, you can follow suit on your own website or other sales outlets.

And if so wouldn't my customers frown upon that?
By this time, you will have so many new customers, that any customers you lose by raising prices won't matter. That's a hard line stance obviously. But there are things you can do to add value to your brand to justify higher prices to your existing customers. Maybe offer existing customers "special edition" designs that are not sold in stores. Maybe start offering different colors, or add rhinestones to your designs, or get your garments custom made, etc.

Also, if you are picked up by retailers, get press in major publications and have a celebrity following, this will all help. If your customers are impressed and are true fans of your brand, they will stick around and pay the higher prices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
GO FOR IT!!! From working jobs our whole lives... until we start our own businesses, we develop the outlook of "start small and build your way up"... I just mentioned that in another thread lol. But that's something you do at a company as an employee.... even though you're getting in that company, moving up, getting raises etc. those are positions that have always been there as long as the company has been open, you're the one who is new. They still target the same type of people, carry the same type of stuff and run things the same exact way.... If you start as a $20 brand, that's what people will see and that's the crowd that will come to you, when you change your prices and designs they leave and go to whoever provides what they want and you have to market all over again. Trying to do it with the same name that has the character it is has in society already can be hard. If you want to be the type of designer that sells limited edition high end designs..... put yourself out there and reach people who by that type of stuff..... Think about it.... new fashions are the new things and cost the most.... you're new.... so you're the latest thing and you should cost the most too. I say go for it!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,680 Posts
But that's something you do at a company as an employee.... even though you're getting in that company, moving up, getting raises etc. those are positions that have always been there as long as the company has been open, you're the one who is new. They still target the same type of people, carry the same type of stuff and run things the same exact way....
The exact same analogy can be used for the retail industry. Clothing brands can come and go, but boutiques and department stores are built to last.

Most high end consumers shop at high end boutiques and department stores. These retailers have built years of loyalty with their consumers by consistently offering quality product and service. Retailers have the power because they have the consumer loyalty. And it's the retail power, not the designer, that can set such a high pricetag.

There is a fundamental difference between selling to consumers and selling to buyers.

If the intention is to sell to consumers, then it's up to the designer to set the retail price. But in my opinion, it's going to take a huge marketing budget and probably a celebrity following or endorsement to command such a high price tag.

But if the intention is to sell to retail buyers, it's more important to focus on the wholesale price and offer enough of a profit margin to the retailer that they pick up your line. The value in selling to retailers is volume. The designer only profits on the difference between the production cost and wholesale cost. So it's not worth worrying too much about the retail price. Leave that to the retailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Everyone is giving great advice :)

I am going to start my shirts out at a price of $50-$75. At that price, when I release the next set of designs I will be able to slightly raise the prices.

I know how to market to celebrities as I worked in PR for 5 years. Once I get a few of them to wear the shirts, the price elevation will be justified.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
If you don't my asking...
How are you planning to sell the tees, on a website or storefront?
And are you using custom made garments or purchasing through a blanks supplier?
I'm starting out selling online. The shirts are from a high end blank supplier. A step above American Apparel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,204 Posts
I'm starting out selling online. The shirts are from a high end blank supplier. A step above American Apparel.
how big a step above...? the only thing AA has going for it is that the cool kids want to wear it...but the quality is terrible..seams not sewn,rips, missing zipper pulls, missing draw string in hoodies, the list goes on..all problems that i have personally seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
how big a step above...? the only thing AA has going for it is that the cool kids want to wear it...but the quality is terrible..seams not sewn,rips, missing zipper pulls, missing draw string in hoodies, the list goes on..all problems that i have personally seen.
My supplier is MUCH BETTER then American Apparel. I agree with you, their stuff is very cheaply made. I visited their showroom, because I was originally going to use their stuff and once I got to see it in person I changed my mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,779 Posts
I hear it time and time again, "my brand is going to be limited editions, no reprints, low stock, and hand numbered." What automatically pops to mind for me as a printer? You don't have the funds! Consumers aren't stupid!

You have to start somewhere, so just start with what you think is appropriate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
This is exactly what I'm trying to do. My clothing line would have a general release which would be below $25 and a limited release and/or "samples" which would go above $30. Right now I have designs ready for our winter collection. But the only shirts printed are in the "general" release section. I've taken the advice to start small but in a different perspective. Hope this helps!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top