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Hi, I just bought a cheap "iron on" transfer at Wallmart and it says it is to be used with a home iron, I actually bought it so I could try my "super cool" heat press that I just bought from "Specialty Graphics Supply" and now I'm not even sure that I can use it :(
Can anybody tell me if there is a setting that I can use to apply this transfer to a T-shirt? Or should I just use my home iron and wait for the transfers I ordered and then try the heat press?
The thing is that I really, really want to try my new heat press....
Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me :eek:
 

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Yep, I used Avery paper with my press. I pressed at 350* but for abou 20 seconds, for light paper. Less for darks, like the 10 seconds mentioned.

If you do press, do place a sheet of parchment paper between your upper platen and the transfer paper to keep your brand new press shiny and clean.

Regular baking paper from the grocery store will work. Best wishes. :) have fun!!!! :)
 

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Yep, I used Avery paper with my press. I pressed at 350* but for abou 20 seconds, for light paper. Less for darks, like the 10 seconds mentioned.

If you do press, do place a sheet of parchment paper between your upper platen and the transfer paper to keep your brand new press shiny and clean.

Regular baking paper from the grocery store will work. Best wishes. :) have fun!!!! :)
Thank you very much! I'll try it today! :D:D:D
 

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Hello,
I noticed that when I make my shirts, they have (barely noticable) burn imprints from the heat press. Will a teflon sheet fix this. (Or wax paper?) I don't think I can get a teflon sheet today and I need to make these shirts today. I also have this protective rubber like piece that sits on the bottom of my heat press that my shirt lays on. (I don't know too much about heat presses, but im guessing all of them come with that rubber piece. (im new lol)

BTW I am using avery transfers. I was told I should do 350 for 20 seconds?

thanks.
 

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Hello,
I noticed that when I make my shirts, they have (barely noticable) burn imprints from the heat press. Will a teflon sheet fix this. (Or wax paper?) I don't think I can get a teflon sheet today and I need to make these shirts today. I also have this protective rubber like piece that sits on the bottom of my heat press that my shirt lays on. (I don't know too much about heat presses, but im guessing all of them come with that rubber piece. (im new lol)

BTW I am using avery transfers. I was told I should do 350 for 20 seconds?

thanks.
The rubber is supposed to be there, every press I've owned has had it, I believe it's there to help dissipate the heat once the pressing's done, provide an easy removal surface, and also to conform around objects other than t-shirts when pressure is applied.

As for the burns, you shouldn't have any real scorching going on at those temps, if it's happening on the design, then a teflon pad might fix this, but it sounds like it's happening all over the shirt. Make sure you're not heating at 350 degrees celsius (overseas presses may list celsius instead of fahrenheit), the above temperatures are all fahrenheit. Sometimes shirts (especially reds I've noticed) will be slightly discolored when they're heated up, but after cooling for about 5 minutes, they're back to their normal colors.
 

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Haha. No actually im very happy you yelled that out bc I would have made a big mistake! Right now I'm doing a lot of trial and error, figuring out what's the best way to go with my transfers. I actually just made a shirt w/o the parchment sheet and the shirt came out fine. Do you have to use a parchment sheet? What exactly is it used for?

The only complaint I have with this shirt I made is you can see the marks from the press on the shirt. (not on the transfer itself) I don't know if this will be a temporary thing or what, but it's like an imprint of the press. :confused:
 

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Bill, hahaha, I was laughing too when I read your post, at the moment in my head I was hearing... NoooooOOOoo... haha, then read you post. =)


Belancer, maybe a little less pressure? Is it 'compressing' the shirt too much, or yellowing it, or both?

I use teflon in the first press, and parchment paper on the second press. I use Reynold's parchment, works great.

Both also help keep the upper platen clean.

The teflon will aid in preventing scorch marks, not the parchment, that I have ever heard it recommended for that, never heard that.

I used to use Avery. Yes, that is a fine temp and time for pressing that. If you get a chance, check out a paper called JPSS/Jetpro Sofstretch. It costs less and is the best paper on the market, imo, at the moment for lights.

Here's some tips if you need any - for pressing with success. PS: I don't know what you need these shirts for, but if they start to fade, make sure you use pigment ink, and if they start to crack, check out a pro paper like JPSS.

transfer paper tips for lasting image - Page 5 - T-Shirt Forums
 

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hey thanks a lot!

I am currently using these avery transfers for a fundraiser. I am selling these shirts at a fundraiser. I actually bought new transfers. Someone referred me to them. They are called Ironall...ever heard of them? I heard their pretty good. With shipping and handling, they come out to $35 for 25. However, they are suppose to be top of the line best. You can even iron over them!:)
 

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I used to home iron Ironall, too. The problem was the fade. They are perfect otherwise. Even thought this is a fundraiser, if you have time and already bought the paper, you should do a wash test to see how long the image will last with the shirt you are using. No sense in making a shirt that could fade on the first wash, no one will use you for the fundraiser again.

If you are going to use Ironall paper, I have some tips for you. Use pigment ink, like you get in the Epson c120. Use a blank shirt called Jerzees Heavyweight 50/50 (50%cotton/50%poly), the style number is 29. I buy mine at Alpha Shirt, and you do not need a biz license or reseller certificate to buy from them.

I tested at least 12 shirts, 100 cotton and 50/50's, to see which would fade least with Ironall, and that was the winning combination.

Some faded on the first wash, some on the third, some faded unevenly. The Jerzees, Ironall and Durabrite did not fade.

This was prior to the release of JPSS/jetpro sofstretch. Once I tried JPSS, I never looked back to Ironall. JPSS did not fade on any of the various shirts I had tried with Ironall, and you can hand iron JPSS, too.

Best wishes, I hope you guys raise alot of money. =)
 

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I press 100% cotton and would not press without a teflon sheet. When I first started the press would scorch my shirts or should I say leave a brown mark on the shirts.

Pressing at 375 at 20 sec browns that white 100% cotton shirt. The teflon sheet totally fixes it. You think they would come with a teflon sheet.

Speciality Graphic did not include a teflon sheet with mine. Luckily I live close to them and bought one.

I also have a fitted teflon sheet on my bottom plate because I do a lot of front and back and easy to wipe off any excess ink or dirt.

I use the Geo Knight 16x20 Clam Shell.
 
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