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Hey everyone,

We've built a drying rack that will house 13 23x31 roller frames, and all that's left to attach to it is the two box fans to the back. Let me know what you all think about this. I didn't attach the pictures to here, I just figured it would be easier to point you to my blog where the pictures are posted... I think there are about 4 pictures. The address is Tance Hughes and it is the most recent post. Thanks in advance.

Tance Hughes
 

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What's to keep the fans from pulling dust and lint over wet mesh? I presume that this rack is for drying wet from reclaim frames, and not frames that have been coated with emulsion, but either way, you'd be better off with a door on the front that sealed tightly had some filter material to keep any crud out of the air that was being drawn through. I know some shops dry their screens by putting a fan on them, but with the amount of lint in a shirt shop, I don't see how they keep the crap out. The drying box I built has a bathroom exhaust fan in the back of the cabinet, and a small furnace filter in the front door to keep the air clean.
 

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Built in spare time over a few days. I've got a table saw which helps speed things up, but it's pretty much just a plywood box on feet with a face-frame, kind of like a kitchen cabinet, with a matching door to give me some surface area for weatherstripping to seal it up.
 

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I like the idea of the fan, how long does it take your screens to dry with that set up? I am one of those printers that do not have a door on my drying rack but it is in a separate room form the printing floor so I don't worry much about lint and dust. I also use a fan to help speed drying so I am sure some particles are flying around but in 10 years I have not found it to be a problem. I think by placing a door and a fan on my drying rack will not only allow me to dry them, but to also store them as I am storing them in a separate cabinet currently to ensure they are not exposed by mistake so I am just curious about the set up.

Also how did you wire the fan?
 

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Emulsion dries in a couple of hours. I rarely am in a rush, as I normally keep a few screens coated in the box. Those cheap bathroom fans come in an enclosure that wires to the house wiring, and has a 2-prong receptacle built inside so the motor can be replaced without pulling everything out of the ceiling. A cheap extension cord works for supplying the juice.
 

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Better than a fan is a small space heater. Fifteen minutes and I can expose my screens. Attach a fixed back wall and put front door on hinges, with weatherstripping around the edges.
 

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I have to run a dehumidifier in my screen room. When I first started printing, and I moved another drying cabinet I had out into the garage, it would take a couple of days for the emulsion to dry enough to use. Humidity in Central Florida is wicked anytime except in the dead of winter.
 

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This is a good thread because I'm going to build my own drying rack soon using a small dehumidifier enclosed in a box. I think it would be simpler to do and just as, if not more, effective as forced air and/or heat. I'll keep ya'll posted.
 

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Hey TPitMan ... great box! Would you be willing to share dimensions and a supply list for it? We are trying to build one here as well ... currently working on our washout booth right now but the drying box is next.
 

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Tom, how do you hold those rack rails up? I don't see any support. Are they simply wood glue + screws?
Glue and a brad nailer. Screws would certainly work as well.
The whole thing was pretty much assembled with the brad nailer and wood glue. The brad nailer works good, along with bar clamps, in holding the edges of the plywood together at the corners while the glue dries. The frame rails are mounted on a slant so that the screen frame only touches along a thin edge. The box was made to accommodate 3 different frame sizes so this avoids having rails so wide that it might get into the wet emulsion on the largest frames.
 

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Thats nice Tom. .Heres mine I just finished. on the one end I have a sliding door with a furnace filter with the dehumidifier, it is located in the basement, so I wanted to be able to control the humidity, on the other end I used a dryer vent to pull air in with a filter behind. It only hols 8 screens but just getting started , thats plenty for me. Thanks, Mark
 

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Tom, 3 different frame sizes? I presume the slanted rails are for that purpose.

Currently I have 20x26" and 18x20 frames. I wanted smaller frames for sleeves and the neck labels but my problem will be fitting them to the width of the rails of my rack.

Anyway, for drying coated screens, I am still using 2x2 wood inserting them between frames stacked in my shower. If I coat at night I just leave it there the whole night. If I coat at daytime, I make sure I have at least 2 hours before leaving home, let the coated screens dry for about 2 hours with the assistance of a fan. For storage, I invert the dried or almost-dried frames and store them under the bed.

I've seen a nice setup where there are also horizontal rails. But the vertical rails (those perpendicular to the front can be slided sideways to fit any frame size smaller than the box.

Hopefully, I will be able to find some time before christmas to modify my exposure unit and build it into my shelves. Then, to set-up my overhead drying cabinet(on my topmost shelf. Got to finalize the plans in the next few days.
 

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thanks to this idea of a drying rack... i copied it.... very nice.
i built the same thing (with fan and a portable heater)....

BUT....

for some reason, some of the coated screens when got dried, they have this kinda like "water drip" bubbles? (i'll try to take picture and upload it later). any idea what I did wrong or what caused those bubbles?
 

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I just had that same problem. Mine most likely was caused by my shop being very cold overnight. Luckily I had just enough screens that didn't go bad to do my runs. I still had to be creative in image placement to work around the droplets. I usually predry them slightly with a hair dryer, but was in a hurry and didn't that night.

Here is my drying cabinet build. I used mostly scavenged materials for the box and ripped some 2x4's for the frame and supports. I can put 13 screens at a time in there and it works great... except in the middle of winter.

I use a heater filter on the side and black humidifer filters at each hole to keep the light out. I crawled inside for about 30 minutes to see if any light got in. My wife thought I was nuts, as I ain't exactly tiny. I do drop a thick sheet of fabric over the front though, just in case.

A small fan from a thrift pulls air out the bottom through a cardboard tunnel. It's a little hooptie, but it works.
 

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It works great and is very quiet. the box sits on one of the flaps and holds it tight to a black humidifier filter that keeps all the light out.

My main problems now are cold and dampness. Predrying my screens a bit helps though, but a small space heater may be needed if it gets any colder this year.
 
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