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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie here, and I ran a Plasisol vs. Water-Based test on a couple of shirts, and I got significant bleed-through on both. The darker shirt is a Zuni 100% Cotton and the white one is a B+C 100% Cotton (Ladies Fitted). Any advice? Is it just a matter of applying too much pressure? I actually want to use the Water-Based ink for my clothing line (better hand), but not if it is always going to bleed this bad…but I even got bleed with Plastisol…

Can anybody help? Thanks!

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Is it just a matter of applying too much pressure?
It's actually a combination of ink viscosity, mesh count, squeegee hardness, squeegee angle, and even speed.
Increasing any of them will reduce the ink deposit.
It will also depends on the fabric, which is obvious from your own examples.

Try this...
Start with a high squeegee angle (lets say 60°), and gradually lower it if required (you need more ink).

Of course, the question now is... which side of the squeegee determines the angle?
It depends on your preferred print stroke direction.
In the following example the position of the squeegee gives push stroke angle of 60°, and the pull stroke angle of 30°.
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Say more about your process. Screen mesh, how many strokes of ink, flash between strokes etc.
Sorry, I realized after the post that I didn’t give enough detail…I used 156 mesh and a 70 squeegee. I prefer a pull stroke, but I’m so new that I don’t really have a set “technique” yet. I did flash after each color, and probably used too many strokes…
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's actually a combination of ink viscosity, mesh count, squeegee hardness, squeegee angle, and even speed.
Increasing any of them will reduce the ink deposit.
It will also depends on the fabric, which is obvious from your own examples.

Try this...
Start with a high squeegee angle (lets say 60°), and gradually lower it if required (you need more ink).

Of course, the question now is... which side of the squeegee determines the angle?
It depends on your preferred print stroke direction.
In the following example the position of the squeegee gives push stroke angle of 60°, and the pull stroke angle of 30°.
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Bob, you’re awesome! Thanks for the tip!
 
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