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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all. I've been heat pressing shirts for years, but for some reason lately I've had a lot of designs come out crooked on my tee shirts. I have a hotronix Fusion.

So with that I thread the shirt upside down on the lower platen. I pull the shirt way past where I need, then as I pull it back toward me I feel the collar edges to align it. Then I grab the armpit area under it and sort of pull and push it until it feels right.

I've been doing a lot of Gildan tees lately and the collars don't seem to jib with the rest of the shirt. I swear it's perfect, but once I press it and lay it out on a table I see I made it crooked. Always one way too.

Any tips on how you make sure a tee is straight? It seems hard to get them really right if they have been folded crooked. Thanks. :)
 

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Gildan shirts are more like seconds, they are often have the neck off center, sleeves not the same size, and so on.

Center on the neck opening and make sure the seams are both at the top next to the neck and folded on them. At that point you will be as straight as you can be.

We use a teflon pillow if the shirts are way off or are the smaller sizes.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Gildan shirts are more like seconds, they are often have the neck off center, sleeves not the same size, and so on.

Center on the neck opening and make sure the seams are both at the top next to the neck and folded on them. At that point you will be as straight as you can be.

We use a teflon pillow if the shirts are way off or are the smaller sizes.
Thanks. I make biker designs and bikers like the big cut of Gildan shirts. I prefer Hanes myself. When I get to size 3XL it's hard to really feel how centered it is.

Plus with big sizes even the shirt lengthwise can be slightly twisted even if the neck opening seems perfect. Guess that is a hazard with Gildans and big sizes.

I print on denim biker shirts and I prefer them way over tees. They have a seam at the shoulder that goes straight across the whole shirt. So you just align the seam with the platen edge nearest you and your good.
 

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Our bike and car clubs like AAA but Gildan purchased them and the quality is spiraling down to the level of Gildan but the feel is better for guys I think.

For Gildan, we have noticed the 2XL and up the neck can be up to 2" off center.

We just live with it, center on the neckline and try to get the top seams to be even before we measure it down.
 

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I screen print, but getting shirts on a threadable "board" is pretty much the same all the way around. I print a fair amount of 2X to 5X Hanes Beefy-Ts, which are pretty much the standard for an old school tubular boxy shirt.

Sounds like we approach it pretty much the same way. I slam the shirt all the way on, so shoulder seams are up against the end/edge, and get the neck centered (the neck guide thing on the board helps, though I know some hate them). Then I balance the side-to-side with the armpit seams. Note, I do that last bit while the shirt is still fully impaled and the shoulder seam hard against the edge, which works better than doing it after pulling the shirt back. Then I grab it two handed and sort of step backward to evenly pull it to the desired position of partial insertion.

But, yeah, there is only so much you can do with a haphazardly sewn shirt.

I also print some Gildan H000 Hammer shirts, but only up to size 2X (my local doesn't carry larger), and haven't noticed an obvious problem with them. But they are just my backup shirt when I'm out of Hanes 5180, so I haven't run through all that many of them. The main downside with Hanes 5180s is that color choices are limited at the largest sizes, whereas Gildan typically makes all colors in all sizes (my local TSC doesn't stock the Hammers like that).
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, that sounds exactly like the way I do it. Only difference is that I do the armpit adjusting after pulling it forward. I'll try doing that with it still pushed way on.

I like beefy-T's, but bikers tend to complain they are too tight fitting, especially around the arms. They tend to be very big everywhere, lol. Love how thick they are though and they hold a transfer well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So today I did some Gildans and some Hanes. The Hanes came out perfect. What I see with the Gildans is that the shoulder seam does not align right with the collar.

So if I have the seams exactly the same just over the platen edge, the collar itself is crooked. If I put the collar perfectly as a half moon aligned to the platen, the shoulder seams are crooked. :rolleyes:

I'm not sure which way the shirt hangs off a person. I'm going to just split the difference and get them as best I can. No complaints so far.
 

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One can spend an inordinate amount of time seeking perfection when good is all that is needed.
My solution, and one that helps greatly when new people are always coming on board, is an extra step at the start of the process.
The shirt is removed from container and folded in half at the tail, then matching the arm seams. The fold representing a center line down the front of the shirt. I quickly press 3 to 5 seconds at low temp, the fold to create a centering line that will press out when the final press is completed.
The center line of the graphic is established in a smilar fashion pinching the top and bottom of graphic to establishes vertical center.
At the press I have a string mounted on frame at platen center and a mark to indicate platen center at operator side. This function is typically not necessary for most garment presses.

With the garment center marked by the light fold and graphic center marked by the pinch, one spends little time fretting about where the side seams are. Three fingers from the neck line and you are off to the races and OJT takes about 30 seconds.
 

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You beat me to it!! I was going to suggest the same method. Works for me like a charm, no one ever knows you pressed a light line down the center of the shirt.
 

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I feel your pain, there is nothing worse than realizing the design is crooked after coming off the press or out of the dryer..... I usually check the armpit spacing on the side of the platen to make sure they are equal on both sides.
 
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