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Juston, you're going around in circles. We are asking what you are selling (and don't say tshirts, that's a given). Is it work shirts, pictures of the grandkids, or a line?

I'm asking because there are different types of transfer and each has a particular strength. I recommend starting by reading some other threads asking the same question.

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am sry for not being clear:( I am trying to make shirts with custom designs (as in a T-shirt line like illustrations and words) and want to know if I should use a heat press or screen print.:eek:
 

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Is this a hobby or are you going to sell them? Are the illustration colored and how many are you looking to make at a time. White / Color shirts? Think ahead of all the possible questions that could be asked and be specific. Without information provided you can't expect someone to pull it all out of you.
 

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I use a lot of plastisol transfers for my designs.....Both custom and stock.....I think they work very well for me....But I will say quality wise or detail wise screen printing is a better choice......But sometimes it is a calculation.....

For an order I had last week, I pre-sold 30 shirts but figured I would sell a bunch more if I had extra transfers....And about 1/2 way through the 1st night of a 2 night event they were sold out....They wanted 60 more and with transfers and shirts on hand it was easy to do....Much harder to do with screen printing unless you screen print yourself....I do not....
 

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You can do either, but heat transferring is more cost effective to start. Silk screeners usually require a larger order. If you get plastisol silk screen heat transfers you can apply on a specific size or color shirt when you get orders so you don't have a bunch of printed shirts laying in stock not moving. Plastisol transfers have a soft feel like good screen prints. You need to do a lot more due diligence before starting your new venture.
 

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Unless you want to make a commitment to stocking an inventory of printed shirts I think that transfers would be the most economical choice for you. You can keep a variety of designs on hand and print on demand. Shirts are readily available on short notice so you will not have to make a large investment in blank garments.
 

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Juston,
People have suggested plastisol transfers, which you would have to buy - you are not (probably) equipped to print them, as they are printed on screen printing equipment.

When you say "the heat press method" that includes any and every type of heat transfer out there - plastisol, inkjet light, inkjet dark, dye sublimation, chromoblast etc.

You should spend a few days and read these forums extensively. The answers you are seeking are there, but you do not yet know enough to ask the right questions. There are a lot of variables. There is no generic "best" only "best for this exact printing method on this exact type of shirt with this exact type of artwork." Until you specify those things, no one can really answer your question.

Not trying to dissuade you, trying to help you help yourself.

Good Luck! :)




 

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Most companies are happy to send out a free transfer sample kit. Have you requested one? With a transfer kit you can use the sample provided and judge the method for yourself. We always tell our customers to wash and dry the garment after it has been pressed. Testing the product for yourself is always the best thing to do. You are the only person that can decide what is right for your company. The fact that you can do it for free is just the icing on the cake!
 
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