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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok, so im still new to the t-shirt business the easy part for me is the design but im having trouble deciding wich method to go with and what products to use

1. need to be able to use 100% cotton
2. use multiple colors
3. fade resistance

my original thought was dye sub but i dont really like the fact i cant use 100% cotton and ive read the 50/50 isnt that great either im just lookjing for some advice and i love this forum bec its full of it, you find more here than days on google =)
 

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ok, so im still new to the t-shirt business the easy part for me is the design but im having trouble deciding wich method to go with and what products to use

1. need to be able to use 100% cotton
2. use multiple colors
3. fade resistance

my original thought was dye sub but i dont really like the fact i cant use 100% cotton and ive read the 50/50 isnt that great either im just lookjing for some advice and i love this forum bec its full of it, you find more here than days on google =)
If you do not have a screen print press. I would recommend plastisol transfers. They are economical and they are basically an alternative to screen printing.

you can learn about the different printing in comparison here

This is assuming you have a commercial heat press by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ya ive researched the main equipment needed im waiting to buy everything untill i have a solid plan on what im going to be selling and what not, the thing about plastisol is i dont like the feel of it even tho im wearing a shirt with some on it some plastisol and some print. what are people doing to print on 100% cotton?

thank you for your reply im gunna check the camparisons =)
 

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Have you considered water based discharge? (Screened.) I am fairly new to the business and I have decided I like it well for doing prints on dark shirts. Especially for black since you don't have to lay down a pound of ink to produce the desired opacity. But the colors are not going to be as vibrant, at least not so far in my experience. It has it's advantages and disadvantages.
 

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Also, I recently attended a two day training course at our local supplier. It focused mainly on screen printing but did cover dye sublimation somewhat. I don't know what the norm is, but what they demonstrated (and sell) are two different systems as far as the type of ink used. One is suitable for polyester only, and the other for cotton only. As far as what they have it would not work for a 50/50 blend. By the way, with the discharge method I mentioned it HAS to be 100% cotton. (At least to fully discharge.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also, I recently attended a two day training course at our local supplier. It focused mainly on screen printing but did cover dye sublimation somewhat. I don't know what the norm is, but what they demonstrated (and sell) are two different systems as far as the type of ink used. One is suitable for polyester only, and the other for cotton only. As far as what they have it would not work for a 50/50 blend. By the way, with the discharge method I mentioned it HAS to be 100% cotton. (At least to fully discharge.)

thanks for the advice. is there an ink that prints on 100% cotton without fading and is not dtg so using transfer paper?
 

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thanks for the advice. is there an ink that prints on 100% cotton without fading and is not dtg so using transfer paper?
No. Some fading will happen on most all t-shirts that are not done with plastisol or screen printing.

If you're looking to do it at home with a printer and heat press, then people generally use inkjet transfer paper for lights like jet pro sofstretch or inkjet transfer paper for darks like ironall for darks. But some fading will happen.

Plastisol transfers don't have to have a heavy feel.

If you click the link that Chris provided above, it tells you all the ways to print t-shirts with a comparison. If you look at the featured threads at the top of the homepage, you'll see similar threads with info for you to research.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No. Some fading will happen on most all t-shirts that are not done with plastisol or screen printing.

If you're looking to do it at home with a printer and heat press, then people generally use inkjet transfer paper for lights like jet pro sofstretch or inkjet transfer paper for darks like ironall for darks. But some fading will happen.

Plastisol transfers don't have to have a heavy feel.

If you click the link that Chris provided above, it tells you all the ways to print t-shirts with a comparison. If you look at the featured threads at the top of the homepage, you'll see similar threads with info for you to research.


ink jet transfers so regular ink or die sub ink? or is it all in the type of paper u use, i should of been more clear on the fading i didnt mean never fade just not after 5 washes lol appreciate the help any other advice would be great thanks Rodney Dan and Chris much appreciated
 

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Hello guys.

One word of caution for using that chart as a teaching tool, it is not complete and still, many categories are far from accurate. Reading the posts *in* the thread will be a better teacher than reading the chart as the posts correct the chart information, and the posts are from experienced users. The chart was done the best that could be done by a newbie, as Qriz also says himself. I am not even sure how many of the thread updates have been reflected in the chart, so for a learning tool, the forum regular threads, asking questions, and reading the featured threads will still be a more viable path than the chart... for now. ;) One day that chart will shine :) it's just not yet. :(

Brandon, if you need to use 100% cotton, multiple colors and have fade resistance, then you are in the same boat as alot of the rest of us. :)

Alot of your choice will be narrowed down by the type of designs you plan to process. Different processes have different limitations with regard to the design they lend themselves to. Here is a thread for you:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/general-t-shirt-selling-discussion/t48532.html

and another:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/general-t-shirt-selling-discussion/t37985.html


The main choices for you are laser transfers, inkjet heat transfers, vinyl (yes, can be multi colored and layered), DTG, plastisols, that is, if you don't want to screen.

If you like the idea of plastisols, call around for some samples. Plastisols vary from each other.
Here are some supplies you can sample to see if someone makes a plastisol you do like:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/t-shirt-crossover-diary-heat-press-newbie/t13454.html
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/heat-press-heat-transfers/t4095.html#post23715

Vinyl can be very soft, some folks report a certain vinyl to feel close to screen printing.

Some folks feel Laser offers a bit more quality than inkjet, BUT, Jetprosofstretch is turning things around and turning heads.

There is a member here, Treadhead/JOhn, who offers screen printing, plastisols, vinyl, DTG and inkjet heat transfers (JPSS) to his customers. He seems to have most of the processes in his arsenal, and even owning a DTG, he says more and more often, he finds himself skipping firing up the DTG in favor of the JPSS as he feels this paper is a viable substitute for his DTG. I thought that was another impressive endorsement for the paper. :)

Officially, I have JPSS shirts printed with Durabrite pigment ink that have not faded one bit all year. I do test that product harshly, with many bleach washes, and still, it does not fade. Pictures:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/heat-press-heat-transfers/t47868.html

Ashamutt is another member here who uses the JPSS and washes her shirts in bleach and no fading for her, I believe she said her shirts are from February. I know I started with the JPSS early last December, so some of my shirts are nearing a year. I can't tell which are older or newer, they all held color, none have aged, and that is what I want from the product. It delivers.

For dark shirts, not so much luck. I like Ironall Dark, but batch to batch, there can be QC issues. I bought a cutter and am going to focus on vinyl for dark shirts, but when needed, will use the Ironall Dark or JetWear Dark. Photo type of shirts require laser, inkjet or DTG when it comes to cotton shirts.

When you use the inkjet process you have to use the correct ink. Your paper choice will help decide which ink you will or can use. Here is that information for you:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/heat-press-heat-transfers/t59987.html#post356402

Dye sub is entirely seperate from inkjet heat transfers. Dye sublimation uses dye sub ink, dye sub papers, and 100% polyester for fabric. Inkjet uses inkjet heat transfer paper, an appropriate ink for the paper (see above link), and 100 cotton to 50/50 cotton/poly blend.

Dye sub adheres to manmade fibers, the polyester.... and Inkjet adheres to the cotton fibers, a mix of no more than 50/50 will work fine. Generally. Good luck to you. Hope this helps continue to get you closer to your goal.
 
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