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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I would like to start Stenciling T-shirts. I already have a few brand new AA T-shirts. I am now at a stand still with this project because I have no idea which Fabric Paints to choose.
The qualities I'm looking for are:
1. Must be a permanent fabric paint with long lasting color (fade resistant or very minimum fading after a few washes).
2. Must not leave the t-shirts hard & stiff.

Here is a list of 8 Fabric Paints I'm considering. I need to narrow the list down and pick one. Please let me know from your own experience which is the best.

1. Deka
NOTE: (I read on one of the other forums that the company that sold this paint went out of business but I did find a company in the UK that sells it)
2. Createx
3. Speedball
4. Versatex
5. Jacquard
6. Setacolor (or Pebeo Setacolor)
7. Jones Tones
8. Aquatex

I'm also opened to recommendations, so if you know of one that is not listed please tell me about it.


I also need to know should I pre-wash the brand new AA t-shirts before using the fabric paints on them? If yes, please explain why?
NOTE: (I'm trying to avoid pre-washing the brand new AA t-shirts because I'm concerned about them losing their vibrant color and that brand new look they have.

Thanks in advance for your help.
RAM
 

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If these shirts are for resale, you should not wash them first. No one wants a shirt that has already been washed.

You should also consider these two professional water-based silkscreen paints:

Matsui
Permaset

both waterbased, low/no hand.
 

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Hey RAM,

Just throwing in my two cents about stenciling shirts. I started off stenciling and eventually moved to screenprinting (really just a fancy form of stenciling, when you think about it).

I was using acetate stencils and Permaset Aqua water-based ink, the same inks I now use for screenprinting (so if you upgrade later, you're not wasting your ink). After letting the water-based ink air dry for 15-20 mins (if the ink is really thick or you just want to speed things up, a hair dryer works wonders here) I would get a bit of baking paper and iron over the top to set the ink. Check the packaging of the ink you choose, for Permaset it was around 2-3 mins at the highest temperate setting.

Really, you're looking for a screenprinting ink, not a fabric ink. That was my mistake initially. As soon as I started searching for screenprinting supplies, I found what I was looking for.

For the record, Permaset owns. Even on my very first shirt where I put the ink WAY too thick (it was supercover) it still handles very little to none, and feels great. The ink outlasted the shirt in every case :)
 

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I have used the Jacquard and Versatex line over the years by themselves and with resists on 100% cotton.
I have also thinned them out to use with water color techniques with the resists. I did pre wash the shirts first to remove sizing that might impede this type of hand painting. I used an iron on linen setting with towels between layers and between iron and painted fabric. If you are an artist it is worth time an effort as wearable art but it is time consuming. I am looking forward to finally getting a heat press and setting up with corel drawing etc to increase volume and turn over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi,

You already know about Blick carrying Permaset. So, here are the other stores that carry the Permaset brand:

1. rexart.com (they sell sets of Permaset ink)
2. utrechart.com
3. fineartstore.com
4. islandblue.com

As for pre-washing the new t-shirts, I was planning on not doing this. So can you please tell me what's the downfall of not pre-washing your t-shirts before you stencil them?

Thanks
 

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I use Permaset only for my screenprinting and it lasts a long time. After 30 or so washings, my own shirts are still bright. The ink is a bit stiff after curing but once its washed it feels like part of the shirt. I don't think shrinkage is an issue these days so I wouldn't worry about washing. Buyers usually buy shirts a bit large anyhow and I think shrinkage is minor. No point in doing extra work if you don't have to and Permaset in my opinion is not affect by sizing. I currently cure with an iron but I'm soon to invest in a good heat press so I can get a consistant cure. You can really tell the difference where it was cured and the spots you missed....yuck! With an iron you really have to be sure you get the whole design or else you'll have complaints after the first wash.
 

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Ok thanks.

Im so new to this so Im just confused. The thread said "Best fabric paint for Stenciling T-shirts". Exactly how do you do this? set up a screen box, throw the stencil over and use the squeegee to apply the ink?
 

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Ok The thread said "Best fabric paint for Stenciling T-shirts". Exactly how do you do this? set up a screen box, throw the stencil over and use the squeegee to apply the ink?
I'm not sure what you mean by screen box, but yeah you basically thrown a stencil (or silkscreen screen) on a shirt and use a squeegee to apply the ink.

On a true stencil where you are using cut cardboard for example, I have seen small paint rollers used.
 
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