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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, we have an e-commerce retail shop primarily selling t-shirts, and printed glassware such as mason jars and pilsner glasses would fit very logically into our available products. We do almost everything in-house, so we'd like to purchase our own equipment.

We've researched it, and it seems like pad printing is the way to go (correct me if I'm wrong, there). I've been looking for a decent pad printer, but there's a pretty wide disparate number of prices and varieties and it's hard to figure out what's not going to be a misstep buying equipment. Can anyone give me some opinions on the best pad printer (or the best method to print, say, 100-200 pieces of glassware MAX per month)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK, cool! Thanks Royce! We're still pretty early researching this stuff, and since writing that, we're kind of discovering the same thing. In your opinion, what IS the best way to print??
 

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is a pad printer a good way to relabel care tags on tees? if so, what else do you need? I would like to relabel my shirts on my own since it seems cheap and simple and will be farming out the rest of my screen printing.
 

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If you need for up to 200 glasses per month I would advise you to sub contact it.
By the time you buy machine, ink, air compressor, plates, oven (don't forget you have to bake them) you will be so much in red that 200 peaces per month will take a loooong time before you are back in black.
Don't forget that there is steep learning curve (with a lot of hair pulling:)) for glassware printing and it will take a lot of your time.
If you decide to go down that road, I would advise you never to get manual pad printer. You will end up going nowhere and most probably you will toss it at the end.
If money is an issue, at DigitSmith you can get good second hand semi automatic one for few hundred bucks.
If money is not great issue go with new one. I would contact Tom at WinonUSA. His machines are of great quality and his knowledge is priceless. He will be there for you to guide you and help you when you are stuck and trust me, there will be a lot of such instances:)
 

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There are lots of very good air dry inks these days......For small runs an oven is not needed.....
That is true to some degree.
Ink that is designed for printing on metal and ink for glass and ceramic will air dry on glass after few days providing that is not to humid or to cold, but if you want for print on glass, and to be dish washer safe you have to use ink for glass and ceramic and to bake it straight after printing.
At least, I am not aware of any ink manufacturer that will guarantee for their ink to be dish washer safe unless it has been baked.
 
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