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Not entirely. I have been printing for 23 years. My experience in four color process printing is what has made the difference in our approach to DTG. We do not view DTG as press the button and go. Our knowledge of true process color seperations for darks in screen printing cut the learning curve.

But what I was actually saying was - a good printer is someone that really cares about the product that leaves the shop. So if you are a good screen printer you probably will be a good DTG printer. If you are a bad screen printer - someone who doesn't care about delivering a great product - your DTG will suck too. DTG is not an easier softer way to success if you don't care.
 

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The main limitation for me is that at 51 units you loose all economies of scale and cannot offer 1000 units at bigger discounts.
The obvious issue is down time. My direct competitors spend more time delaying or cancelling jobs as their Kornits choke...
 

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Thanks Kevin @ROYAL SAVAGE. Care to share some specifics?
Sure. Using basic seperation knowledge leads to better prints. We create hundreds of pieces of art per year that are painted in Photoshop. Every file is prepped in the exact same way as a screen printing sep would be. WE have some proprietary actions we use but the two mediums require exactly the same approach. Remember ink is ink the only difference is the delivery method. Are you a screen printer by trade like I am?
 

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Not entirely. I have been printing for 23 years. My experience in four color process printing is what has made the difference in our approach to DTG. We do not view DTG as press the button and go. Our knowledge of true process color seperations for darks in screen printing cut the learning curve.

But what I was actually saying was - a good printer is someone that really cares about the product that leaves the shop. So if you are a good screen printer you probably will be a good DTG printer. If you are a bad screen printer - someone who doesn't care about delivering a great product - your DTG will suck too. DTG is not an easier softer way to success if you don't care.
I agree with this. I've seen some really bad screen prints and dtg prints and the printers think they are really good.

It's always puzzled me as to what people think quality is and isn't.
 

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Are you a screen printer by trade like I am?
unfortunately, I'm not. We are an embroidery shop, using laser and vinyl transfers, and added a Mimaki DTG with discharge fluid and now waiting for our Kornit 932-6.

Do you mean to say, you do file preparation/color separation exactly the same as you do them for screen printing? Kinda still use half-tones and stuffs even though you are to print them in your Kornit?
 

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unfortunately, I'm not. We are an embroidery shop, using laser and vinyl transfers, and added a Mimaki DTG with discharge fluid and now waiting for our Kornit 932-6.

Do you mean to say, you do file preparation/color separation exactly the same as you do them for screen printing? Kinda still use half-tones and stuffs even though you are to print them in your Kornit?
Halftones are a function of output to convert continuous tone to a printable form for screen printing or offset exposures. DTG prints continous tone which means there is no interuption by halftone dots. However some of our special effect look like halftones. THere is in our opinion viable reasons for utilizing our screen experience in DTG
 

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I am not a DTG naysayer.

2 things: Yes I do agree on the user treating the machine like a tractor!
Personally I would love to have my own DTG but a partnership is the way I am proceeding. A Brother it is!!!

Cant wait as I have soo many designs ready to go!!!
 

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and I'm thinking, maybe one of those reasons is so that you could readily "switch" to screen printing if a certain design (initially printed in your Kornit) gets a volume order. Maybe making a design "DTG and Screen Printing compatible" is (at times) a great idea...
 

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I've been screen printing for a couple of years now, and have just recently been considering switching over to DTG.

The information in this thread has been invaluable and I want to thank everyone that's posted their experiences with DTG!! I've still got a lot more research to do, but this has given me great insight as to some of the complications with DTG.

Thanks again!!
 

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I've been screen printing for a couple of years now, and have just recently been considering switching over to DTG.

The information in this thread has been invaluable and I want to thank everyone that's posted their experiences with DTG!! I've still got a lot more research to do, but this has given me great insight as to some of the complications with DTG.

Thanks again!!
Switching is not the answer. Learning how to marry the decorating disciplines you have is. I am a long term scree printer, embroidery and DTG printer. Having both mediums is very usefull.
 

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That's pretty much the conclusion that I've drawn. Though now I'm leaning more towards not even messing with DTG since it seems the only real benefit I would get out of it would be printing one off's

Which in that case, I'd rather just find a DTG printer to partner up with and work out a deal to have them print the small stuff for me.
 

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Whew, these 4 pages had a lot of information!

What if a sheet fed printing co. wanted to get into DTG? I have the software and the graphics knowledge and have been dealing with ink, halftones, cont. tones, spot colors and solids for the last 17 years. I have a really good customer base for shirts and all have expressed interest if I proceed. I see paper-based reproduction as a dwindling market. I want to diversify by getting into a market that isn't going to be replaced so easily (Unless nudity gains wild popularity), but not replace our printing on paper (the equipment is well maintained and paid for).

DTG (Neoflex) is what we are considering, but this thread has made me question if this is the right move.

For those of you offering both (DTG and Screen Printing), at what quantity does DTG become more expensive (Say at 1 or 2 Colors)?
 

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Thats the thing 1-1000000 colors same for DTG. It does not care. Now white shirt vs dark colored. Dark requires white ink (pita).
You really can only get about 8-10 shirts per hour on a dtg a few more if white shirt no white ink.
I draw the line at 50 shirts for a simple 1-2 color. Full million color requiring 6 screens at 100-150
 

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For those of you offering both (DTG and Screen Printing), at what quantity does DTG become more expensive (Say at 1 or 2 Colors)?
We found that One-Color, light garments (no white) the break even is 30 shirts, dark colors is 5 shirts.

On white, 2 colors - 150 shirts, 3 colors - 700 shirts.
On dark, 2 colors - 11 shirts, 3 colors - 19 shirts.

Clearly a big difference! By the way, this includes labor cost, since we have employees. The numbers are different if you don't want to calculate labor.

We basically have a big excel sheet that tells us which is faster and which is cheaper, based on our values for production times, ink costs, etc. (Sometimes the deadline is a bigger factor than money!)
 

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Whew, these 4 pages had a lot of information!

What if a sheet fed printing co. wanted to get into DTG? I have the software and the graphics knowledge and have been dealing with ink, halftones, cont. tones, spot colors and solids for the last 17 years. I have a really good customer base for shirts and all have expressed interest if I proceed. I see paper-based reproduction as a dwindling market. I want to diversify by getting into a market that isn't going to be replaced so easily (Unless nudity gains wild popularity), but not replace our printing on paper (the equipment is well maintained and paid for).

DTG (Neoflex) is what we are considering, but this thread has made me question if this is the right move.

For those of you offering both (DTG and Screen Printing), at what quantity does DTG become more expensive (Say at 1 or 2 Colors)?
This is not complicated. The market you sell to will dictate your decision. I do a lot of licensed product. We also print volume. I am a 23 year veteran of screen printing. The two mediums are unrelated in many ways. We do not generally print spot color on DTG mahines. Our DTG machines are primarily for full color printing on black and dark goods with continuous tone. There is a learning curve to all of this. You have a slight edge as a printer but you don't know this substrate. I would encourage a ton of research and don't go cheap on DTG gear if you are a commercial printer. Here is some additional perspective for you. READ my latest article in Impressions Magazine.
 

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Great information! That is exactly what I was looking for!

I have read a lot about this process requiring pretreatment with DTG, but the 2 machines that we have looked at in detail (Anajet and Neoflex) seem to mention that no pretreatment is required.

What exactly is pretreatment and why (or why not) would it be required?
 
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