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No, they don't offer this information up :)

Their marketplace uses an algorithm that takes into account a combination of factors to sort the search listings.

I don't think the top shops would want people snooping into that kind of info though.
 

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Looking at the last 3 years of eBay records however allows you to identify the best selling shirts (and eBay sells more shirts than all the other sites combined....t-shirts are one of the biggest clothing categories, and eBay sells more clothing than any other "retailer", bar Walmart, and more clothing on-line than the next 30 sites combined)

The best thing about eBay, even if you don't sell there, is its publically viewable sales history.
 

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monkeylantern said:
Looking at the last 3 years of eBay records however allows you to identify the best selling shirts
How do you do that?

(and eBay sells more shirts than all the other sites combined....t-shirts are one of the biggest clothing categories, and eBay sells more clothing than any other "retailer", bar Walmart, and more clothing on-line than the next 30 sites combined)
Are these facts, or just guesses based on the volume you see?

Since some of the other site's information is not public record, it seems like this would be hard to verify.
 

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Just search "completed auctions". There are many bits of software out there to analyse the mass of data. Most cost money however, but are excellent (Andale etc).

And they are "facts" based on extrapolation.

eBay press reports have announced their clothing market share, both on-line and compared to highstores, and it is one of their largest categories. I'll try to dig one up.

They haven't specifically talked about t-shirts, but from the sale numbers and eBay Pulse, you can see tshirts are one of the major subsections.

You can put thse together, and *presume* that the major subcategory in a major category is indeed one of the biggest market places.


Just to put it in perspective, in the UK, eBay makes up 2% of the *entire* British retail economy, as of June 2005. No, that's not a typo. Between .25%-.8% of that is clothing.

There following is educated guess work: from looking at eBay's figures through a research tool such as Andale, about 10-15% of the clothing category seems to be t-shirts (I last did proper research about 6 months ago, so this may have changed).

As you can see....immense.
 

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I can see how the numbers that eBay posts show that they sell lots of merchandise, but I don't see how that shows that they sell more than all the other sites combined without knowing other site's numbers.

I'm not saying that eBay doesn't sell a lot, I'm sure they sell a ton, but without knowing how much other retailers sell, those who keep private figures, it wouldn't seem like you could call them facts.

edit: just checked out Andale...looks like a pretty darn cool service. :tipthank:
 

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I presume that, in order for eBay to make claims about on and off-line percentages, they have a way of mining this data from company tax returns etc, and things that aren't available to the average Joe.

I mean, Heinz sells 62% on the beans on the British market. How do they know? I presume any company, apart from the very small, have profit announcments etc.

eBay has the added bonus of owning Paypal, so I'm sure they pull apart the statistics of every sale from that too.

As ebay is in the business for proving how big (and hence important) they are, I'm sure they have hundreds of people pulling apart market data. Probably they even have ties to Visa and Mastercard, with more information to mine.
 

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My bad, I missed the part in your earlier post that said that eBay itself put out press releases about their clothing market share.

Although I've learned first hand that you can't believe everything that you read in major news outlets or press releases ;), it does help give some credibility to the idea.

I'm sure they do a huge volume of sales though (in any given market).
 

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I agree. But while companies will always bend the truth to their favour, they can't really make it up whole-cloth (apart from Enron, oil companies, and Haliburton, of course). :)
 
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