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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to print a two color design, one base color and then the details of the design on top. I have two different screens to do this because of the color separation that I need, but I am having a hard time lining everything up perfectly. Right now I am just starting off, and I'm just using the screens (I plan on building the 4 color manual press from the free plans on found on this forum soon!) on my kitchen table. Does anyone have any tips or tricks of the trade that I could use to get everything lined up nicely? Eyeballing isn't working as well as I'd like (I am a perfectionist)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I try to keep the screens from moving by holding them down with my free hand...not very scientific, I know, but like I said, I'm just starting out, and I don't have much equipment
 

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I try to keep the screens from moving by holding them down with my free hand...not very scientific, I know, but like I said, I'm just starting out, and I don't have much equipment
HMMM it may be a bit hard to get perfect registartion if you dont have anything holding the screen down good. The shirt might move and the screen might move as well.
 

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If I'm doing more than one color, I use a combination of registration marks and pre-exposure registration. I try to make sure that my positives are as close to registered in the screens as I can get them before I expose them - I know some people use a grid system, but usually I just use a T-square and measure the distance from each side and use that for each positive. After they are exposed, use the registration marks to line them up, but make sure you tape off the reg marks before printing. Without a 4-or-more color press, I think those are the best you can do.
As for holding the screens down, you might want to try C-clamps. Also, if you get a cheap table from a thrift store or garage sale, you can buy some hinge clamps and screw them to it. Those will help with registration and with keeping the screens in place, and you won't have to worry about getting ink in your dinner ;) With both, don't forget to keep the screens off-contact.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If I'm doing more than one color, I use a combination of registration marks and pre-exposure registration. I try to make sure that my positives are as close to registered in the screens as I can get them before I expose them - I know some people use a grid system, but usually I just use a T-square and measure the distance from each side and use that for each positive. After they are exposed, use the registration marks to line them up, but make sure you tape off the reg marks before printing. Without a 4-or-more color press, I think those are the best you can do.
I'm assuming that you're talking about putting small marks every cm (or whatever measurement works for that design) right on the screen, but is it on the mesh itself or on the wooden frame? Or am I way off and it's something totally different?
 

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I use the T-square method where I just measure the distance of the bottom right corner of the film positive from the bottom and the right of the screen frame. Then I make sure each of the other color positives is set at that distance as well (keeping each positive parallel with the bottom, of course).

I've only read about the grid method. But from what I gather, it involves having a pre-drawn grid beneath the screen (on the table where you align the positive) and you can sort of see through the screen. It most likely involves a darkroom safe backlight so you can see the gridlines best. Or maybe a grid overlay. I'm not positive since I don't use this method.

Another way that works after you've exposed the screens is sort of explained on this site: No Media Kings How to Silkscreen Posters and Shirts
It involves a large sheet of acetate that you attach to one side of the table, then print the first color on it, fold it back, do you printing of that color, then when you switch screens, fold the acetate back and use it to register the new screen.
 
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