T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 16x20 Geo Knight press but need to be able to press some items that are 24 inch long.

Only thing i can find that is not junk is the Geo Knight 20"x25 but it over $2800 to much for me to invest in right now.

Are their any lower cost heat presses that heat even and work good that will get me the 24 inchs i need.

Will be Pressing items that will be no larger then 8 inch x 24 so skinney and long would work.

Have not tested yet but if i place a 24 inch long aluminum panel on top of my 24 inch wood item i am pressing to do you think that will heat up the extra 2 inchs sticking out each side to make a good transfer ??

Thanks
 

· Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I've heard good things about GECKO for low end models. Just placed my order for their GK103 16x24 model. Got it for $340 on ebay with free shipping (from a Top Rated Plus xmember).

But the general consensus about low end models seems to be you either get a fully functional press or don't, regardless of how well recommended the brand/seller. Just make sure to get an infrared thermometer and that the seller has a proper return policy.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Interesting. It seems one person received a damaged press that needed to be replaced. The other review seems to be good.

Amazon Verified Purchase Bought this 24 by 16 press with great expectations, but was sadly disappointed. Heat element cover was dented on front corners as if over-clamped by a fork lift. The table on the press would not clamp down with equal pressure due to the entire deck being out of alignment. Equal pressure is important for doing transfers with fine detail. I had to jury rig the deck with rubber bushings under frame on deck mounting bolts so when the deck clamped shut would give-way enough to flatten out. I also put flat washers under the front left side, between the bottom deck and frame to give it about about 3/16th of an inch of shim. Frame was obviously welded together in an UN-square manner. I got the darn thing working good enough to do simple transfers, but not with complex patterns having fine detail. If this machine is any indicator of Ricoma quality then walk on by this line of machines. I would have posted pictures, but the review page doesn't have a picture upload option.

Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No 0 of 1 people found the following review helpfulGreat Machine
By Amazon Customer on June 3, 2013
Amazon Verified Purchase Great Heat Press for the price and a few questions and called up and had them answered on the spot
 

· Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
I have the same press and have pressed half and half before with exceptional results. Of course, I'm sure it depends on the material. Some will be forgiving (like mousepad/fabric material) and some may not (like aluminum or hard substrates).

Maybe you can print the image in 2 parts (2 sheets of paper) and press half, then press the other half; hanging the already pressed half off the heat platen as not to fade or blur the image.

Maybe worth a try before investing hundreds, even thousands. Or look for a used Geo Knight 20x25.

Places like this are gold mines for some.
http://www.digitsmith.com/geo-knight-20x25-swing-away-heat-press-39501.html
 

· Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Unfortunately good and cheap do not always go hand-in-hand. For a 24" press capability the Geo Knight DK25S (20 x 25) really is the best bet. Too many people make the mistake of going cheap on the heat press when it such a vital part of the consistency needed for good sublimation results. Look at the press as more of an investment. A good one like this lasts a very long time and holds its value. If you ever upgrade to something larger it would not be hard to find a buyer for this as a used press.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
When I first started out, I didn't have the money to purchase a Knight press and was forced into going the "cheap" route with Ricoma. In a time span of 1 year, I went through 3 Ricoma presses. This really blew because the total amount I spent for the 3 Ricoma's, I could have had a Knight press...but....if you don't have the money, you don't have the money... Anyway, after a couple years, I finally got the Knight Press and I am very happy with it AND the customer service that comes with it.

What happens with the Ricoma's is that they die completely after a very short amount of time. Or, the fuse blows. Sometimes when the fuse blows, it also melts which means you can't replace it and your press is dead. Or they actually catch on fire (happened to me!). Most often though, one of the springs on the bottom of the press (there are 2 of them) snaps and then you can't use the press. No one that sells these presses offers good customer service, although I DID manage to purchase a new spring twice. The problem is trying to put the spring on the press....you really can't stretch it at all! What I came up with was to purchase a bag of 1 inch metal washers from Home Depot. Then I began wedging the washers in between the coils of the spring, which slowly stretches the length until it's long enough to slip over the metal bolt like connections on the bottom of the press. Once attached, you open the press, the washers fall out, and the spring is now attached.

Also....I really can understand the financial side of this and the need for the 24".... I wish I had that again too but be prepared to shell out more money over time. Of course, failure ALWAYS occurs at the worst of times as well (Murphy's Law). Also, make sure you have it plugged into an outlet with at least 20 amps or higher breaker otherwise it will run hot and flip your circuit breaker. It may also catch on fire (lesson learned....)

Ohh...one more thing...often times the timer doesn't work on the Ricoma which also blows. I bought a cheap clock from the Dollar Store & mounted it on the wall behind the press so I could keep my eye on the dwell time.

I just read all the other posts, and someone else mentioned something I had forgotten about...but it IS true! The Ricoma press often does arrive dented, and closes unevenly. Because of what I was pressing, this wasn't an issue for me, but it DOES exist. There are cold spots as well, so if you are printing something as long as you say you need to, you may have some problems...

Hope this helps....good luck....;)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What about this press it seems to be a pro unit and a little larger and with stand for a little less??
the
Metalnox EL 800

GO Metalnox EL 800 Heat Press

Unfortunately good and cheap do not always go hand-in-hand. For a 24" press capability the Geo Knight DK25S (20 x 25) really is the best bet. Too many people make the mistake of going cheap on the heat press when it such a vital part of the consistency needed for good sublimation results. Look at the press as more of an investment. A good one like this lasts a very long time and holds its value. If you ever upgrade to something larger it would not be hard to find a buyer for this as a used press.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I will stay away from that .. Thanks for the info

When I first started out, I didn't have the money to purchase a Knight press and was forced into going the "cheap" route with Ricoma. In a time span of 1 year, I went through 3 Ricoma presses. This really blew because the total amount I spent for the 3 Ricoma's, I could have had a Knight press...but....if you don't have the money, you don't have the money... Anyway, after a couple years, I finally got the Knight Press and I am very happy with it AND the customer service that comes with it.

What happens with the Ricoma's is that they die completely after a very short amount of time. Or, the fuse blows. Sometimes when the fuse blows, it also melts which means you can't replace it and your press is dead. Or they actually catch on fire (happened to me!). Most often though, one of the springs on the bottom of the press (there are 2 of them) snaps and then you can't use the press. No one that sells these presses offers good customer service, although I DID manage to purchase a new spring twice. The problem is trying to put the spring on the press....you really can't stretch it at all! What I came up with was to purchase a bag of 1 inch metal washers from Home Depot. Then I began wedging the washers in between the coils of the spring, which slowly stretches the length until it's long enough to slip over the metal bolt like connections on the bottom of the press. Once attached, you open the press, the washers fall out, and the spring is now attached.

Also....I really can understand the financial side of this and the need for the 24".... I wish I had that again too but be prepared to shell out more money over time. Of course, failure ALWAYS occurs at the worst of times as well (Murphy's Law). Also, make sure you have it plugged into an outlet with at least 20 amps or higher breaker otherwise it will run hot and flip your circuit breaker. It may also catch on fire (lesson learned....)

Ohh...one more thing...often times the timer doesn't work on the Ricoma which also blows. I bought a cheap clock from the Dollar Store & mounted it on the wall behind the press so I could keep my eye on the dwell time.

I just read all the other posts, and someone else mentioned something I had forgotten about...but it IS true! The Ricoma press often does arrive dented, and closes unevenly. Because of what I was pressing, this wasn't an issue for me, but it DOES exist. There are cold spots as well, so if you are printing something as long as you say you need to, you may have some problems...

Hope this helps....good luck....;)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top