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I have been using max opaque inks to do solid 1 color prints with no under base. Now I want to move on to multi color prints. My question is. When you print your under base. Do you want it to be solid? From my past experiences I have always had to do a print flash print to get a solid color. Is 1 print stoke enough for a under base, or should I print flash print it too?

I have a customer that wants to print his logo on the left chest of polo shirts. Is there any thing special I need to do here? I'm wondering how this will turn out because of the texture of the shirt. Will the print have a texture too?
 

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Depending on how much ink you lay down for your underbase, you shoudn't have to pfp the underbase before you put your spot colors on top. We have never had to pfp an underbase, just one stroke, flash, then all your colors on top. The lower the mesh count and the thicker your stencil will allow more ink to be deposited on the top of the shirt. We tend to use low meshes for our underbases so we never have to worry about double stroking or pfp our UB screens.

A lot of printers have moved away from using 110's and 125's for underbasing to reduce the hand of the print. I have no problem with that method but what I have noticed is that many of them (not all) tend to have to double stroke, or pfp the underbase and end up having a print that is the same thickness as a single stroked 125, which is defeating purpose. Just keep in mind that going up in mesh count might not yield the best feeling print like you hope if you have to resort to adding strokes to get enough pop out of your top colors. Likely you'll have to experiment and find that middle ground that suits your customer's wants and something that's not too thick, yet bright enough. You can play around with mesh counts and stencil thickness to find that look and feel that you are after. What one printer thinks is opaque, another might not think so, judging a final print is very subjective. I don't really like the way our prints look with high mesh underbases and I have been able to print our UB's with low mesh and thick stencils while not having the print be "bullet proof".

We did a 3 color on mustard yellow today with an underbase white, drake red and dark brown and white. We were able to use our underbase for the white in the design as well, therefore eliminating the need for a highlight white screen. The underbase was on a 110 with a 115 micron EOM stencil, the dark brown and red screens were on 156's with a 30 micron EOM. The total thickness of the print was 80 microns. I've measured shirts that we've had customers bring in to duplicate and I've seen some prints that were 400 microns thick. The UT shirts with white designs that most people wear around Austin these days are typically well over 100 microns in thickness with some up to 250 just to give you some idea of what I'm talking about. A sheet of copy paper is around 80-100 microns thick.
 
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