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Do smaller printheads have a higher rate of getting clogged?
that i don't know, you would think being their higher end printhead they would not (but who really knows with epson)
here is some info on the ecotanks and where i saw the different droplet size

the last epson i bought was a 7700 and it died right on schedule (1 month after warranty expired, should have bought the extended warranty)
they also have an 'end of life' mode which kicks in when epson decides you have printed too much, and you either bring it in to the repair center or throw it away
when you set it up initially, try to do it without internet connection and then firewall it from trying to contact epson (and it will, i would not be surprised if epson hasn't added a microphone on it that listens for keywords like 'inkowl', 'cosmos', 'sublimation', etc.)
 

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Do smaller printheads have a higher rate of getting clogged?
It depends what you mean by "smaller".
Smaller nozzles would of course clog easier, but all these printers have the same nozzle size, around 20 microns in diameter.
The difference is that the newer precisioncore printheads have longer modules with more nozzles.

As I've already mentioned in my previous post, cheap printers have one module, and the more expensive ones have more of them.
Obviously, if the ink works with 4 printhead modules, it will also work with one.

You can basically swap inks between any of these printers.
What you should not do is mix them. Flush the printer before refilling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
that i don't know, you would think being their higher end printhead they would not (but who really knows with epson)
here is some info on the ecotanks and where i saw the different droplet size

the last epson i bought was a 7700 and it died right on schedule (1 month after warranty expired, should have bought the extended warranty)
they also have an 'end of life' mode which kicks in when epson decides you have printed too much, and you either bring it in to the repair center or throw it away
when you set it up initially, try to do it without internet connection and then firewall it from trying to contact epson (and it will, i would not be surprised if epson hasn't added a microphone on it that listens for keywords like 'inkowl', 'cosmos', 'sublimation', etc.)
Now the networking stuff us right up my alley.
 

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here is some info on the ecotanks and where i saw the different droplet size
The info in that article is incorrect!

EcoTank models that use Epson's conventional Micro Piezo print head are usually paired with dye ink exclusively.
This is not true. Here is a printer with the "conventional Micro Piezo" printhead but the black ink is pigment.
Font Rectangle Parallel Web page Number


Models with Epson's more advanced PrecisionCore print head are usually paired with dye color inks (CMY) and pigment black ink (PB).
Not true either...
Below are two printers with identical printheads (the newer PrecisionCore), BUT the inks are different.
Epson also has cartridge based printers with "conventional Micro Piezo" printheads, which are also using DURABrite pigment inks for all colors.
Font Rectangle Parallel Web page Number
Font Rectangle Parallel Web page Software



Two exceptions to this rule are the EcoTank ET-7700 / L7160 and ET-7750 / L7180 printers. This pair of A4 and A3 printers are designed for the premium home printing market. They feature Micro Piezo print heads that can produce droplets down to 1.5pl in size.
Interestingly the "older conventional Micro Piezo" printheads are the ones producing the smaller 1.5pl droplets. :unsure:
Rectangle Font Parallel Web page Screenshot

There are two keywords people fail to notice here..."Minimum" and "Variable".
The 1.5pl size is just a capability these printheads have, and can be used when required.
Font Screenshot Parallel Number Document

The PrecisionCore printheads also have variable droplet size (3.8 to 12.3pl).
The "conventional Micro Piezo" printheads are still widely used and are in many cases desirable.

Anyway, all the Epson inks used in these printers are interchangeable.
The picolitre value is just the amount of ink the printhead is capable to apply per droplet.
Epson is using dye inks in some models to satisfy customers looking for more vibrant colors, and pigment inks in other models to satisfy people like us.
 

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they also have an 'end of life' mode which kicks in when epson decides you have printed too much, and you either bring it in to the repair center or throw it away
This is just an internal counter and can be reset, but you will have to replace the waste ink absorbing material inside the printer to avoid leaks.
A firewall will not help. The printer is doing it internally.

Printers with "maintenance box" don't have this issue. The counter is in the chip attached to the waste box.
New box=new counter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
This is just an internal counter and can be reset, but you will have to replace the waste ink absorbing material inside the printer to avoid leaks.
A firewall will not help. The printer is doing it internally.

Printers with "maintenance box" don't have this issue. The counter is in the chip attached to the waste box.
New box=new counter.
Ya I've already looked this up thats easy for me. Also right up my alley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The info in that article is incorrect!


This is not true. Here is a printer with the "conventional Micro Piezo" printhead but the black ink is pigment.
View attachment 277317


Not true either...
Below are two printers with identical printheads (the newer PrecisionCore), BUT the inks are different.
Epson also has cartridge based printers with "conventional Micro Piezo" printheads, which are also using DURABrite pigment inks for all colors.
View attachment 277318 View attachment 277319



Interestingly the "older conventional Micro Piezo" printheads are the ones producing the smaller 1.5pl droplets. :unsure:
View attachment 277320
There are two keywords people fail to notice here..."Minimum" and "Variable".
The 1.5pl size is just a capability these printheads have, and can be used when required.
View attachment 277321
The PrecisionCore printheads also have variable droplet size (3.8 to 12.3pl).
The "conventional Micro Piezo" printheads are still widely used and are in many cases desirable.

Anyway, all the Epson inks used in these printers are interchangeable.
The picolitre value is just the amount of ink the printhead is capable to will apply per droplet,
Epson is using dye inks in some models to satisfy customers looking for more vibrant colors, and pigment inks in other models to satisfy people like us.
This explains a lot. Now I just need to decide on the 2850, 2800 or 8550....inkowl had thier pigment ink compatible with the 2850 and cosmos has theirs compatible with the 2800 and 8550. Either way a cheaper reliable source of ink. That 8550 prints delicious 13x19.
 

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thank you all for the very useful information... I need to refresh my old Artisan 835 printer... and want to be able to print T-shirts as hobby with good results, so a silly question: If I get a ET 2850, and get pigment inks either from Epson (2542?) or a third party, I should be good to go, right? and which would be the best (fool-proof; for white and dark) heat transfers I would need to get, please...I really want to start this hobby with my kids... thanks for any/all advise. JB
 

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so a silly question: If I get a ET 2850, and get pigment inks either from Epson (2542?) or a third party, I should be good to go, right?
Epson T542 ink bottles, or third party DURABrite compatible inks.

which would be the best (fool-proof; for white and dark) heat transfers I would need to get, please...
There is no fool-proof option... I've seen people doing silly things.
Jet Pro soft-stretch for white/light color shirts works well enough.
For dark garments I would try the new Siser EasyColor DTV.
 
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