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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I am seeking advice on how to prevent adhesive on nailheads and rhinestone (motifs) from going through the very thin cotton jersey tees I am using.

I ordered custom motifs and had them heat-transferred onto t-shirts only to find the fabric is so thin, that the front of the shirt was glued to the back. On regular weight cotton tees it was not a problem. I like the thin jersey fabrics for women's tees and was thinking a solution may be to make some sort of insert to put inside. But before recreating the wheel, I thought I'd see if any of you have solutions. The company doing the transfer had no suggestions, as they generally only print on heavy-weight tees.

Any thoughts on trouble-shooting are greatly appreciated!

Thank you,
Dage
 

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What about sliding a piece of parchment paper inside the shirt. Have never tried it but I don't know why it wouldn't work.
 

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Dage Gillan said:
I like the thin jersey fabrics for women's tees and was thinking a solution may be to make some sort of insert to put inside. But before recreating the wheel, I thought I'd see if any of you have solutions.
For craft-type applications usually I put in a piece of the cardboard that comes inside dress shirts when you buy them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you very much for your suggestions. I have been racking my brain about materials... and think the adhesive would get glued to any kind of paper or cardboard and it might also fry and crumble creating more work. I'll bring some to the company that does the heat transfer for me and do a test run.

The ideal material would be something that won't melt, burn, or get stuck to adhesive. I am looking into heat resistant silicone -what those new oven mits and pads are made of. Not so easy to find in a larger size... Please keep the ideas coming! Do you know anyone who has encountered this problem that I can contact? Thanks again for your help. :)

Best,
Dage
 

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Parchment paper is silicone-impregnated paper and very heat resistant (especially if it is inside the shirt) and will withstand any heats that you are using to adhere the stones with. Parchment also has a surface that is fairly non-stick that is why it is readily used for baking. I think you are over complicating the situation. Good Luck.
 

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Dage Gillan said:
The ideal material would be something that won't melt, burn, or get stuck to adhesive. I am looking into heat resistant silicone -what those new oven mits and pads are made of. Not so easy to find in a larger size... Please keep the ideas coming! Do you know anyone who has encountered this problem that I can contact? Thanks again for your help. :)
Parchment paper should be fine. I cook with it and it holds up against 425 in the oven.

If you want silicone based, get a "Silpat" silicone baking sheet. They are expensive, but they come in lots of sizes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jasonda said:
Parchment paper should be fine. I cook with it and it holds up against 425 in the oven.

If you want silicone based, get a "Silpat" silicone baking sheet. They are expensive, but they come in lots of sizes.
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Thanks Much! I tested the parchment, which eventually started sticking to the glue. The Silpat, though is great! I only problem is that the cross-hatch pattern of it does get transfered onto the tee. I will keep experimenting though. Thanks for all your input!

Best,
Dage
 

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I do only crystal and rhinestud t shirts, I use a thin piece of cardboard in the middle and it has worked well, you can also use a non-stick pressing sheet( I use one on top of the crystals/rhinestones.) You should only be pressing the rhinestuds for 45-60sec and probably less for lighter weight fabrics. Don't know how thick silpat is, keep in mind you need to iron on a hard surface.

Cheryl
 

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I put a small towel inside the thin shirts and pull it off while it's still warm. If your thin shirts got glued together, just warm them up in the heat press and pull the front and back apart.

Alicia
 

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Use a Teflon pressing sheet. You can pick one up from any Fabric store, or you can get one from most of the sites that sell heat press vinyl products.

That's the only thing I use. The glue does not stick to it. Also, if you are getting a lot of "melt through", you may want to reduce your heat setting and/or pressure to help.
 

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Boy does this show how threads live on....10 posts over 3 years ago...one post a year ago and now a couple posts this year. it show how info we post can be valuable long after we hit 'post reply' button. good stuff!
 

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I too use the teflon sheets. I've done two sided rhinestone t's on thin teen t-shirts and accidentally glued one together but my daughter was able to get it apart. I always use a teflon sheet between the layers now on the thinner materials. Works like a charm and is worth the expense.
 
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