T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry to sound ignorant, I am really new to all this:

I am doing most if not all of my design work on Illustrator and Photoshop.

Will my design essentially be the same, once it goes to print on a shirt. For instance, let's say I have lettering, "Collection". If I want the word "Collection" to come through looking weathered and all crumbly looking, would I have to make it that way on Illustrator? Or, does the screenprinter do that? And, some of my letters/designs are faded, different tones, etc, different opacities on Illustrator.... will it come out that way on print?

I am familiair (somewhat) with old, hand-made silk screens. I am not up to date whatsoever on modern technology and what can and can not be printed, and how to actually bring it to the printer.

I just dont want to make designs on the computer with different opacitys and different styles (as in a very weathered look) if the printer is going to tell me if doesnt matter.

I was looking at these shirts at www.domrebel.com and i like the look of these being all beat up, etc. Can I take these to a printer and they can do that look with the paint,etc., or am going to have to print these on my own with my own screen printer?

Sorry for so many questions.....

-C
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
We are all beginners at some point. I myself am learning CorelDraw 12 right now through every free tutorial and book I can get my hands on.

Here are some distressed look overlays (no, I have no clue on how to use)
but the downloads are free! Scroll down to Miscellaneous.

http://screenprinters.net/downloads/

Any printer, t-shirt or traditional off-set press (paper) will want "camera-ready"
Keep us posted on what your screen printer wants?

I just found out my screen printer wants me to make "white" text in another color such as blue to distinguish from black design elements.
I need to note on my workorder "all blue text is white ink".

Also find out what version you need to save your art file in. In my case I had to save down to Corel Draw 11. Also you need to make sure they can screen fine lines, lines close together. I believe the minimum space is 1/8th of inch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This is all great information.

Thank you.

I have a question about printing "fine lines" ... what do you mean? A printer cannot print something in Illustrator that is, say, 1.0 points, or less?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
cposch said:
I have a question about printing "fine lines" ... what do you mean? A printer cannot print something in Illustrator that is, say, 1.0 points, or less?
The best thing to do is call the screenprinter and ask. As with anything, some may be more skilled at what they do than others. I heard direct from a silkscreener that some of his colleagues do not run clean shops, are sloppy or just want to get the job out the door quickly. I am not saying by any means all screenprinters operate this way. I appreciated his headsup...I was getting a bid on decals (not shirts).

I would show the silkscreener any fine lines you may have in your design.
If you're in CorelDraw, you can break apart the objects and text very easily.
I was prepared to do that with one of my layouts.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top