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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure I can't be the first t-shirt designer to encounter this problem, but I didn't find much discussion on the issue... so here's the scenario:

I've got this cute little character that is to be printed front and center on some t-shirts. I've already had some sample shirts printed with the graphic sized and placed exactly how I want it, and I've had several lady friends try the shirts on.
What I'm noticing is that the graphic looks great on smaller breasted women, but on bigger breasted gals... not so great. You know - the artwork gets distorted, cuteness factor of the character is lost....

Any ideas as to how I might circumvent this problem without compromising my initial vision (of having the graphic big and bold on the front of shirt)??
 

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Sounds like the problem is the design is stretching too much. What type of application are you using? Is it a vinyl transfer? Plastisol? Other?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Heheh, well this thread turned a bit comedic...
but yeah, actually - the image that buehrle posted gives a good enough example of the problem I'm talking about.

You can see how the 'S' of 'Salty' and, to a lesser extent, the 'G' of 'Dog' are horizontally distorted. And while it's true that guys are going to be looking because of the breasts and not because of the graphic... C'mon, you know that every guy who sees that image is thinking (whether consciously or not) "Mmm... Salty Dog!"

And there it is - the image makes an impression because of its association with what lies beneath. So back to the problem: if big breasted ladies are going to be drawing attention to my artwork, what can/should I do to maintain proper proportions of said artwork?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Regarding the suggested solutions:

SeasonEnds and Tangledthreads, it sounds like you are both giving similar advice with your suggestions to "Print Proportionally" and "Proportion the design to fit the correct size tshirt".
I had considered the possibility of tapering the top portion of the graphic to accommodate the anticapted distortion, but this seemed like a risky idea, given that not all girls will be stretching the artwork to equal extent (and as mentioned, the artwork looks fine on smaller-average bust sizes).
But I might be misinterpreting your suggestions. If so, please clarify.

As for getting shirts that fit correctly, I'm using t-shirts by a reputable manufacturer, but SeasonEnds' mention of using proper fitting shirts perhaps points to a potential cause of the problem: All of the well endowed ladies who tried on my shirts claimed to wear a size SMALL (in accordance with their thin waist lines)... but maybe they should have really been wearing a size MEDIUM?

ayukish, you asked for clarification on the print method: The sample shirts were printed Digital (Direct To Garment), but for the finals I wish to use water based inks. What's the verdict - must I go with plastisol if I'm to keep distortion at a minimum?

wormil, the artwork is pretty large, so moving it upward would only distort a different part of the graphic. I actually asked my lady friends if moving the artwork down (below the breasts) was an acceptable solution... to which they all said NO! (Conflicting focal points being the presumed line of reasoning.) I wonder though if shrinking the graphic so that there is less surface area for the boobs to affect might be an acceptable solution?
 

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oh no! don't move it TOO far up to the neckline! That can make large busts look 'droopy' :(
Not flattering! Too low, as you mentioned, yeah.. changes the focal point.

Don't place it smack bang in the middle of the bust area, place it slightly higher, so if larger bust girls try it on, the design isn't sitting where the tee stretches between the breasts.

Print proportionately & not with thick plastisol inks.

I personally would go larger with the design as I suffer from the big boob issue. I'd rather the design distract from them then draw MORE attention to it with a smaller design! Cover more surface area!

Good luck! Make sure you show us when you work it all out!
:)
 

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wormil, ...
I wonder though if shrinking the graphic so that there is less surface area for the boobs to affect might be an acceptable solution?
The only universal solution is going to be moving the graphic out of the stretch zone. It might look okay shrunken, post a pic and lets see what we're talking about.
 

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ooh sexy! lol :)
If that is how the girls want to wear it, then I wouldn't really worry too much! It doesn't look stretched out & it's not like it's drawing UNWANTED attention to her boobs!

I thought you meant it was more like a tshirt rather than a cropped top. I think it works, especially with the slight v-neck on it. If it didn't have a v-neck, then it should be moved closer to the neckline, but I think it looks fine!

Also, i don't know how well ribbed fabric would work with water-based inks (though I'm not a screenprinter), so in this case, I would say stay with plastisol, contrary to what I said earlier!

Looking good! :)
 

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Thread note: please note that some posts have been moved out of this thread. Let's try to keep this thread helpful and on topic. No need for other posters to be posting other photos to take the topic off track. Please keep the discussion professional :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I missed whatever it was that caused Rodney to step in and clean things up, but based on Midnightparade's 2nd response in this thread, it sounds like some posted images might have led to the conclusion that I had adequately solved this problem?

To clarify: I am still seeking the right solution to 'the problem', and I've attached a couple quick Photoshop mock-ups to illustrate the exact situation that I'm dealing with.
(Understand that I am NOT printing shirts with Garfield's image on them - just using the Garfield image here in this post for purpose of demonstration.)

The first image shows the mock-up shirt (size SMALL) on a slim woman with a slim waist and a small-average bust size. The t-shirt's graphic remains in proportion to the artist's original rendering.
The second image shows the same size SMALL shirt, on a woman with a similarly slim waist line but a larger bust line. The horizontal distortion of Garfield's head is indicative of the type of distortion that I would like to avoid.

Is there a way to solve this problem without changing the size and location of the graphic?
 

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I missed whatever it was that caused Rodney to step in and clean things up
Someone else was posting pictures and writing posts that gave the impression they were answering for you. I don't think they did it intentionally, but it was confusing. I had a post removed where I asked if you were posting through two accounts.



Is there a way to solve this problem without changing the size and location of the graphic?
The only way I can think of would be to switch to a generic, unisex tee, like a Gildan 5000. They are so boxy and oversized that it is a lot less likely to stretch them out of proportion.

Personally I wouldn't worry too much about it. I get why it bothers you but in those cases where they are stretched, most people won't be focusing on the graphic.
 

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thats a tough one froman. Im just not sure there is much you can do to combat the distortion of the picture when it stretches.
only things i could think of: maybe stretch the shirt before printing. not sure how that would work out.
or possible switch to a less stretchy shirt that is designed for the larger busted girls. so it fits them without stretching your image.
 

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I will usually ask the person where they want the image to start...distance from collar, sides etc if I am doing a design that might have some issue for different female forms.

by the way...are you asking for trouble with Garfield image?
 

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you guys are way too uptight. i was not looking to answer anyones question but to inject a little humor into your lives. if i offended anyone with a couple of breast then oh well. the topic was how shirt logo warped on breasts right ? as you saw i had the same problem but it was a good thing. next time i'll just put up pics of frogs of butterflies.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Oh, I just noticed that the first image that you contributed was among the posts that got removed. Even if that picture was posted primarily for entertainment value, it did work well as an example of our artwork getting stretched as a result of the problem stated. Oh well, guess that's how it goes sometimes.

So I'm getting closer to having my shirts printed, and am coming to terms with the fact that my customers' varying bust sizes are just one of those factors that I cannot control.
But before printing, there have been a couple recommendations in this thread that I would like to better understand:

- Several folks have advised to 'Print Proportionately'. Does this mean that the size of the graphic should increase for each increase in shirt size? (For example: size SMALL is 15inches across the bust, and size MED is 16inches across the bust... So the graphic should be printed 1 inch larger on the MED?) Or does Print Proportionately mean something different?

- I previously mentioned that I want to use water-based inks, but if I use plastisol, would that help at all to counteract the potential stretching?

- And if I were to use plastisol, would my artwork ...(which is similar to the Garfield image shown on previous page in that the line-thickness and image size is very much the same)... would such artwork be more likely to crack upon being stretched if plastisol inks were used?

Thanks everyone.
 

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Im working on a bar and grill using stahls sports film vinyl and one of the girls actually ripped the vinyl in the chest area..Ive tried 100% cotton and 100% polyester ...the letters also ripple. They request that all the shirts on the girls are tight fitting. What do i do?
 
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