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Hi All,
I have never really done any CYMK work before but I am itching to try it. I need to push myself out of my comfort zone.

Would it be best for a beginner to try it out with water based or plastisol?

Also is 230 mesh ok to start or should I go for the 305?

Thanks!!!

Ken
 

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230 count for a detailed shirt is plenty high. I personally use water-based inks and like the results and natural feel of them. For dark colors on dark shirts, I use a white layer of opaque ink, flash dry it, and then add the desired color on top or I apply it wet on wet with discharge. Plastisol is too heavy and rubbery of a feel IMHO. And it weighs a lot on the shirt especially in the heat.
 

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Are you using an automatic or manual press? I would personally start with plastisol than work your way to waterbase. This will allow you the extra time to play with the technique on the machine with out having to worry about the ink drying up in the screen. Once you figure out all the details than I would rock and roll with waterbase.
 

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process colors (CYMK) are pretty soft and print soft to the touch...305 is the norm. just as important are your seps..make sure they are done correctly or your desired colors will never happen. your pressure and squeege angle has to be even and consistant.
 

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process colors (CYMK) are pretty soft and print soft to the touch...305 is the norm. just as important are your seps..make sure they are done correctly or your desired colors will never happen. your pressure and squeege angle has to be even and consistant.
the mesh count has nothing to do with it EXCEPT on the lpi of the halftone vs. moire. Hence for all lpi (not dpi) 35 lpi x 4 = 140/ Mesh to use 160. lpi 50dpi x 4 = 200/ Mesh 230. 65 lpi x 4 = 260/ mesh 305.

Waterbase and plastisol don't matter. You are using so little ink with hardly any pigment both will be soft. On darks waterbase and dischagre is the way to go. I don't do that as it hardly occurs for me. So I just use plastisol white backer BUT a very expensve white that goes through 230 mesh @ 50 lpi. in one hit with a 70/90/70 squeegy using elongated mesh. Works on 50/50 t's too.
 

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I agree with Foot Print.
I've never seen process plastisol inks do a heavy, rubbery print.
They're a transparent ink. Also, yes, definitely go with the 305 screens, although if you need an underbase, I'd go with a 230 for that.
 

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I've used plastisol process inks on 180 mesh screens, more ink deposits, and it is difficult to say that they're plastisol just by touching. The feel(or hand) we usually associate spot plastisol inks with is not there.

If you plan to use quality process inks 250-305 mesh should be OK. But not all plastisol process inks, especially the cheaper ones, are 305 capable on a manual press. It will penetrate the mesh with harder strokes no doubt but to do it again and again for say 20 or more shirts may be too tiring.

If you are willing to use the best inks then 305 is probably not an issue. Here, they usually cost 50-80% more than the cheaper plastisol process inks though.
 

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I agree that for a beginner, plastisol might be the better choice. But, I disagree regarding, the resulting hand. IMO, plastisol CYMK is equivalent to using Union ultrasoft plastisol inks. I use Matsui manually pushed through 305 mesh and the print is considerably softer than Union process inks, especially after washing the shirt... The hand from my brother's T-Jet is softer but, I don't like the T-Jet print after washing and his T-Jet2 has size limitations... *I waterbase CYMK on prints 14" X 28", and for that, waterbase soft hand is an asset on 3.5 to 4.5 ringspun cotton tees! :)
 

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To elaborate on my earlier post, as posted above, "I've used plastisol process inks on 180 mesh screens . . . The feel(or hand) we usually associate spot plastisol inks with is not there". Plastisol ink sits on top of the fabric and can not match the softer feel of waterbase inks which can penetrate into the fabric.
 
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